1 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 1:16 PM

So its kinda dawned on me that when you get up and running and learn the ropes a bit etc, you start thinking about getting back what you put in.
Ive done an english bitter which took me 5 weeks ( 2 weeks fermenting, 1 week cold crash, 2 week minimum in bottle)
Ive done a stout that i wont consume for at least 3 months which is all bottled
Currently i have a pimped IPA which will again take 5 weeks minimum
So if brewing is gonna take minimum 5 weeks and your previous brew yielded 20 litres (which has to do until your next brew) that gives a consumption rate of 4 litres per week (which is 8 pints , im sure we'd all drink that on a slow night)
So im thinking today , perhaps i need me a new fermenting vessel. my brew fridge will fit it as ive just measured
Wondering how many on here have a second FV for this reason (or any other reason)
or are content with their yield as is

2 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 1:39 PM

I usually do a batch on average every 3 weeks or so, ales taking about 16-17 days in the FV and lagers around 4 weeks, but I record them all in a spreadsheet. In 2016 I brewed 452 litres, last year was down a bit due to moving house at 383 litres, this year so far it's at just over 100 litres*. I've thought about getting another fermenter but then I'd need another brew fridge and it's not practical at the moment. I will be doing some stout or porter fermented at ambient around September though when it's not too hot again yet, to store away for next winter.

Once you get a bit of a stockpile going, the carbonation time becomes irrelevant because you can drink other batches while the latest one carbonates. Similarly, with kegs it becomes irrelevant because they can be carbonated in a matter of hours, though I usually go for a two day carbonation phase. I have two full kegs on tap now, but am fermenting the next two batches while those are consumed. Hopefully I can get them both into kegs before these current two run out.

*Because I no-chill my wort, it doesn't go into the fermenter on brew day, so these figures are just for the brewing of the wort itself. There was a 25 litre batch that wasn't pitched with yeast until January but brewed last year so it went in last year's litreage.

Cheers

Kelsey

Cheers

Kelsey

3 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 1:49 PM


Yeah, two fermenters and a fridge that will hold them both give you lots of options.
Two cheers for Kelsey!

4 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 1:50 PM

Cheers for the feeback Kelsey (when i see your forum name it always reminds me of that simpsons scene with Otto)

Couple of questions, I have been doing a bit of research on kegs and they seem wholly worth it. You can have carbed beer within hours or a few days at least. No pissing about with bottles and all that entails.
Kegs, worth it, even when doing kits and bits ?

2nd question is the no chill. Im doing kits and bits. I tend to leave my above pitching temp wort in the fv and put in the fridge with lid clipped on until the morning (its hooked up to the inkbird)
when it comes down to 20 degrees, i pitch.
Any issues with this type of chilling ?
i dont think id like a wort chiller and ive seen enough of king ruds videos to know he almost dislocates a knee when expelling the air from the cube

5 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 3:12 PM

I brew and bottle and have 5 batches concurrently in various stages of carbonation. So that's about 140 bottles in storage at all times. That is the inventory I require for mine and my guests consumption.

I have 3 fermentation vessels but usually only use 2 at a time. One in fermentation and the second in cold crash phase. My process varies from summer to winter but I have 2 fridges which concurrently ferment and cold crash. The fermentation fridge runs on an Inkbird controller with heat pad inside fridge looking after temperature sags. It either runs at 12c for Lagers or 19c for Ales. The second fridge/freezer looks after cold crash duties and runs normally, able to be turned down to 0c when required.

I manage to slip a few Lagers or other long brew processes in over winter when my beer consumption reduces and I can afford longer equipment utilization periods.

My bottle conditioning, given the high volume of bottles, is done in my garage/shed in a very large and internally insulated tradesmens tool box, one of those ones they have in the back of a ute. The box contains up to 2 heat mats mounted edgeways and are controlled for heat only (winter) by a Willhi single relay controller. Bottles are usually contained within this unit for up to 4 weeks then are transferred inside and stored under my bar in milk crates for consumption.

Last year I produced approximately 900 litres of all kinds of kits'n'bits, and have now begun extract plus adjunct brews. All but 2 of the kits'n'bits brews were Coopers based which I highly regard.

Once the required ‘inventory’ level is accomplished, the job is easy-as, and the beer is well conditioned and very good quality. I don't term it ‘home brew’, I just call it ‘Brewing’.

Cheers,

6 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:21 PM

Paddybrew,

I love having kegs. If you value your time I would switch to kegs. The only drawback is the sharing with friends and family, but if you don't mind company it is all good.

Cheers,
Norris

7 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:52 PM

When I bottled I used to brew every 2 to 3 weeks, 1 batch done 1 batch on. Since kegging I do a batch about once every 3 to 4 weeks, trying to have a beer ready when a keg blows. My ales go quick while the sweeter stuff, ginger beers and ciders tend to sit for 2 months or more, depending on the amount of company. I have a few times thought about using my 2nd fermenter, it doesn't have a lid and I used to use it for bulk priming, to have 2 batches going but I have never done it, mainly due to using a sink to keep temps in check.

Once your pipeline/stocks are up you really only need 1 fermenter, but having a 2nd for bulk priming is handy.

Norris

8 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 7:50 PM

Hey Paddybrew,

Once I got the brewing bug, (like it sounds you have as well), I decided to get a second fermenter.

I was running out of beer in between batches and had to buy cartons from Dan Murphys etc.

My brew fridge was big enough for 2 FV's, just can't have the krausen collar on - which I have never used anyway.

Brew nights are double batches, pale ale or IPA and a darker ale - ESB or Stout, (start to finish 3.5 hours).

Just using kits, LME , DME, grain steeps and hop boils etc.

I have now got a kegerator, which has cuts bottling night down to about 1 hour for ~44 litres of beer (2 kegs and 5-7 PET bottles). Used to be about 3 hours.

I haven't ran out of beer since Christmas before last and that was because we went away for 4 weeks and I couldn't get a brew down.

I will be starting AG soon when I pick up the Robobrew Version 3, in early May.

So will either have a long double brew day, or brew on consecutive days, or buy another Robobrew!!

Good luck, drinking your own beer is so much better than forking out fortunes for something that usually isn't as rewarding!!

Cheers

James

9 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 9:59 PM

Paddybrew:

2nd question is the no chill. Im doing kits and bits. I tend to leave my above pitching temp wort in the fv and put in the fridge with lid clipped on until the morning (its hooked up to the inkbird)
when it comes down to 20 degrees, i pitch.
Any issues with this type of chilling ?
i dont think id like a wort chiller and ive seen enough of king ruds videos to know he almost dislocates a knee when expelling the air from the cube


Hi Paddybrew. Yes, there are issues with that type of chilling. I think what you are doing presents a high risk for infection. You need to get the yeast in the wort ASAP. What you are doing is not really no chilling. All grain brewers, who do full wort boils, put hot wort into cubes, which sanitizes them. In addition, I think expelling the air is an important part of the no chill process, not only because of expansion, but because many spoilage bacteria and wild yeast need oxygen. As a kits and bits brewer your wort would not be hot enough to sanitize the FV.

If you are a kits and bits brewer, you should try to chill your wort down, at least to 25C, pitch your yeast as soon as possible, and then set it in your brew fridge at 20C.

You should not have any trouble getting your wort close to pitching temp if you either 1.) chill some of your top up water in the fridge the night before, or 2.) chill your hop boil pot in a sink full of ice water for 20-30 minutes, before diluting it in the FV. I start rehydrating my yeast right after putting the hop pot in ice water and by the time the yeast is finished rehydrating, the pot has cooled.

Cheers,

Christina.

10 Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 11:31 PM

I brew in fits and bursts so I have two fermenters and a fridge that can hold them both. Leaves me with HEAPS of flexibility so very happy with that. Also, by “two” I mean “three” as I now have a smaller fermenter for experimental batches, but only two fit in the fridge so two is my official answer

11 Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 9:37 AM

I found 1 FV was not enough so i do 2 brews every month now (50 litres) i always have a good stock level now. Some people say it's hard brewing 2 different batches in the same fridge (due to timing) but I've never had an issue with it.

Cheers,
Hoppy

12 Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 11:45 AM

Everyone drinks different volumes at different rates. It's about setting up a regime/system that produces enough beer to keep up with your demand. For some that might require putting a new brew down every week, for others that might be every 2nd, 3rd, or 4th week etc.

To get your stocks up so that you can be drinking beer that has suitable ageing on it, when you've finished bottling a batch, get to & put another brew down pronto. Don't leave an empty FV sitting around for too long I say.

Hoppy:

Some people say it's hard brewing 2 different batches in the same fridge (due to timing) but I've never had an issue with it.

If you're brewing the same type of beer & not bothering to cold condition batches then this can certainly be done. I wouldn't advise you try this approach if brewing a Lager & Saison at the same time though.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

13 Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 11:57 AM

Yeah I found when I started I was drinking more than I could make.
But I eventually caught up when I started kegging. Although I'm stretched when a few of the boys come over and have a session, that takes me a month or two to recover from.

I have 2 fermenters but my temp control only fits one so it's a bit annoying.
Once winter comes along I will be able to ferment 2 at once, just use a heat belt on the one not in the fridge.

14 Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 1:04 PM

Hi Ryano.

Ryano:

…Although I'm stretched when a few of the boys come over and have a session, that takes me a month or two to recover from.

I have 2 fermenters but my temp control only fits one so it's a bit annoying.
Once winter comes along I will be able to ferment 2 at once, just use a heat belt on the one not in the fridge.

If you need to catch up your stock levels & your temp controlled fridge only has room for one fermenter you can actually remove the fermenter from the fridge once FG has been reached (usually no more than 7 days for a typical ale) & allow it to sit at ambient conditions for the second week prior to kegging/bottling.

This then frees up the temp controlled brew fridge to begin fermenting another brew.

I use this practice all year round (when necessary).

Cheers,

Lusty.

15 Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 1:36 PM

Beerlust:

Hoppy:

Some people say it's hard brewing 2 different batches in the same fridge (due to timing) but I've never had an issue with it.

If you're brewing the same type of beer & not bothering to cold condition batches then this can certainly be done. I wouldn't advise you try this approach if brewing a Lager & Saison at the same time though.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.



Hahaha yeah definitley has to be the same style

Cheers,
Hoppy

16 Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 6:08 AM

Paddybrew:

Cheers for the feeback Kelsey (when i see your forum name it always reminds me of that simpsons scene with Otto)

Couple of questions, I have been doing a bit of research on kegs and they seem wholly worth it. You can have carbed beer within hours or a few days at least. No pissing about with bottles and all that entails.
Kegs, worth it, even when doing kits and bits ?

2nd question is the no chill. Im doing kits and bits. I tend to leave my above pitching temp wort in the fv and put in the fridge with lid clipped on until the morning (its hooked up to the inkbird)
when it comes down to 20 degrees, i pitch.
Any issues with this type of chilling ?
i dont think id like a wort chiller and ive seen enough of king ruds videos to know he almost dislocates a knee when expelling the air from the cube

Kegs are absolutely worth it in my mind. So much easier than faffing around with bottles. Some people think they'll drink more if they have their beer on tap instead of in bottles, but once the initial novelty of it where you do drink a bit more wears off, consumption returns to normal. At least for me it did anyway.

What temp is the wort when it's “above pitching temp”? As Christina has said already, this is bad practice. You want the yeast in there ASAP and it doesn't matter if the wort is at 30 degrees or whatever, you're better off pitching the yeast then putting it in the fridge set to your ferment temp than leaving the wort exposed to infection for however long.

Cubing an all grain wort is a completely different thing, but if you brew enough wort to begin with you shouldn't be nearly dislocating knees trying to expel the air from it

Cheers

Kelsey

17 Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 7 AM

Just an idea but couldn't a mini no-chill container achieve a safe way for the wort to cool without adding the yeast? say an 10 litre sealed ‘cube’?

18 Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 7:51 AM

Gully85:

Just an idea but couldn't a mini no-chill container achieve a safe way for the wort to cool without adding the yeast? say an 10 litre sealed ‘cube’?


Are you boiling the full volume?

Cheers,

Christina.

19 Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 8:25 AM

Beerlust:

Hi Ryano.
If you need to catch up your stock levels & your temp controlled fridge only has room for one fermenter you can actually remove the fermenter from the fridge once FG has been reached (usually no more than 7 days for a typical ale) & allow it to sit at ambient conditions for the second week prior to kegging/bottling.

This then frees up the temp controlled brew fridge to begin fermenting another brew.

I use this practice all year round (when necessary).

Cheers,

Lusty.


Ahhh this is something I did not think about. I suppose it's no different to conditioning in bottles in ambient temperatures…. Thankyou for the tip!

20 Posted: Monday, April 16, 2018 9:01 AM

ChristinaS1:

Gully85:

Just an idea but couldn't a mini no-chill container achieve a safe way for the wort to cool without adding the yeast? say an 10 litre sealed ‘cube’?


Are you boiling the full volume?

Cheers,

Christina.


No but it was more of a inquiry, I sometimes get very time poor so doing a small boil, 1 night and then finish off the next night is a great option for me and if it can work.

joy of having 2 kids