1 Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 5:08 PM

I'm going to brew a stout tomorrow so it's ready for winter. Here's my ingredients:

Cooper's Stout can
Cooper's Dark Malt extract 1.5kg (liquid)
100g Cocoa powder
200g choc malt cold steeped overnight
3 X vanilla beans (one for boil, 2 for adding to FV before bottling)
2 X Cooper's kit yeasts rehydrated.
Brew to 19 ltrs.

As above I'm currently steeping the choc malt overnight in the fridge. I'll do a 15 minute boil adding 1 vanilla pod at 10 mins.
I'll soak 2 other vanilla pods in vodka to be added to the FV later on, similar to a dry hop.

My question is this. Would adding dextrose to bump up the ABV have a negative effect on the flavour and body of this beer?
I was thinking of adding either 200 or 300 g of dextrose but I'm worried it'll thin out the mouthfeel and dilute some of the flavour I'm after. Any advice on this please? Cheers.

2 Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:38 PM

i am no expert but i think it will thin it if you want it stronger just drop the litres or bump it with malt . I havent made stout but i have made strong dark ale and the only type of sugar i would use is belguim candy sugar/inverted sugar homemade isnt hard to do and it just makes it a little sweeter IMHO hope this helps look up inverting sugar cheers Brian

3 Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:48 PM

the coopers toucan stout has a kilo of dextrose and from what ive read on the thread, it doesnt thin it out

4 Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:59 PM

Paddybrew:

the coopers toucan stout has a kilo of dextrose and from what ive read on the thread, it doesnt thin it out


Paddy is right the brew has 1 kg of dextrose.My question is why does it thin Apa's and other beers and not stout.I have never tried in belguim style dark ale for that reason ???? just askin if somebody has the answer cheers Brian

5 Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:43 AM

Dextrose doesn’t ‘thin’ a beer, but it will finish lower than if you used malt. That is, it doesn’t activiely thin a beer.

So if you have designed an all malt recipe and then decided to add an additional 500g dextrose, it will increase the OG but the FG should be about the same. So the beer isn’t any thinner.

If you replace malt in the recipe with dextrose then it will be thinner than the original recipe without dextrose.

It is all about balance in the recipe formulation. Dextrose has a place in extract brewing, especially when making some bigger beers that will finish with a high FG if using all malt.

6 Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2018 12:57 PM

Hairy:

Dextrose doesn’t ‘thin’ a beer, but it will finish lower than if you used malt. That is, it doesn’t activiely thin a beer.

So if you have designed an all malt recipe and then decided to add an additional 500g dextrose, it will increase the OG but the FG should be about the same. So the beer isn’t any thinner.

If you replace malt in the recipe with dextrose then it will be thinner than the original recipe without dextrose.

It is all about balance in the recipe formulation. Dextrose has a place in extract brewing, especially when making some bigger beers that will finish with a high FG if using all malt.

+1

Beers such as stouts use a good whack of very rich, bold flavoured grains that have a low fermentability, thus also increase the remaining body in the final beer once fully fermented. Using dextrose in brews with such bold flavours, makes it's detection very difficult in the final beer flavour.

Beers such as pale ales generally use lighter more delicate malted grains as the backbone for their malt derived flavour, thus using larger quantities of dextrose makes its detection far more obvious in the final beer, often to it's detriment if too much is used.

Cheers,

Lusty.

7 Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2018 1:42 PM

Beerlust:

Hairy:

Dextrose doesn’t ‘thin’ a beer, but it will finish lower than if you used malt. That is, it doesn’t activiely thin a beer.

So if you have designed an all malt recipe and then decided to add an additional 500g dextrose, it will increase the OG but the FG should be about the same. So the beer isn’t any thinner.

If you replace malt in the recipe with dextrose then it will be thinner than the original recipe without dextrose.

It is all about balance in the recipe formulation. Dextrose has a place in extract brewing, especially when making some bigger beers that will finish with a high FG if using all malt.

+1

Beers such as stouts use a good whack of very rich, bold flavoured grains that have a low fermentability, thus also increase the remaining body in the final beer once fully fermented. Using dextrose in brews with such bold flavours, makes it's detection very difficult in the final beer flavour.

Beers such as pale ales generally use lighter more delicate malted grains as the backbone for their malt derived flavour, thus using larger quantities of dextrose makes its detection far more obvious in the final beer, often to it's detriment if too much is used.
Lusty.

Cheers,
thanks Hairy and Lusty that explains to me why it is more noticable in a lets say Apa so on cheers thanks

8 Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:19 PM

I decided against using any dextrose. The OG ended up being 1058. I've chilled and tasted what was in the hydrometer and it's very rich. Should age nicely and still have a fair kick to it

9 Posted: Sunday, February 11, 2018 11:40 PM

Just a tip for next time: yeast eat up vanillin during fermentation, so no point adding them to the boil, or any time before fermentation is complete. Best to add them after fermentation is over, around day five. They release their flavour slowly, so don't be in a hurry to bottle.

You can also get vanilla flavour from oak, which is much cheaper. Try adding 30gm of *medium* toast (avoid dark toast, which has had the vanilla burnt out of it) Hungarian or American oak cubes (avoid using chips) for 1-2 weeks post fermentation.

Your OG sounds a little high. Did you take the reading after you added the cocoa powder? Might be throwing it off a little. Not a big deal though. You could still add a bit of sugar if you wanted too. I often add 200-300gm of sugar to my brews and it doesn't hurt them a bit (I wouldn't use more than 10% though). If you do add some sugar, wait a few days for the yeast to ferment it before adding your last two vanilla beans.

Enjoy your brew.

Cheers,

Christina.

Last edited by ChristinaS1 (Sunday, February 11, 2018 11:40 PM)