1 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 2:41 PM

Hi just finished brew of the month Duece lager, tastes beautiful still in fermenter using Be3 as per Coopers recipe.Which is predicted to be 4.2% ABV. Could I substitute !kg of LDM for the 1kg Be3 called for in recipe without altering beer characteristics too much or could I add say 250-500 grams of Ldm to existing Be3 and get a slightly higher ABV% without altering taste too much.Thanks Tezza

2 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 2:48 PM

I think you probably could - from my experience a kilo of be3 or LDM doesn't change the flavour a lot - especially in the case of this beer because the hops will cover that up.

I haven't put the brew on yet, it's on the list, but wondering why they chose BE3 instead of LDM. Guessing they are looking for a light, crisp flavour.

Other thing I wonder about this ROTM is why the 2 packs of yeast? Surely one would be more than enough to ferment this. I'm thinking of saving the other one for a second batch.

3 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 3:03 PM

Thanks Beervis I will use 1kg Be3 and add 500gm of Ldm and pretty sure it wiill be ok.Just about to keg 1st batch of Deuce lager and tastes really nice in fermenter Thanks Tezza

4 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 3:24 PM

Because it's a lager and fermented at low temperatures, that's the reason for the two packs of yeast. Gets that clean flavor lagers are known for. I've seen a few of those recipes, both ale and lager, calling for larger amounts of malt that would require more yeast as well, and it's usually advised in those cases.

5 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 3:35 PM

Hi Otto thanks for that.The yeast seems to have done a great job and was really active Saflager W-34/70 That is something I will always remember about lager needing more yeast so thank you for that info. Happy brewing tezza. And realise i need to do more homework on fermentables.

6 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 5:34 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

Because it's a lager and fermented at low temperatures, that's the reason for the two packs of yeast. Gets that clean flavor lagers are known for. I've seen a few of those recipes, both ale and lager, calling for larger amounts of malt that would require more yeast as well, and it's usually advised in those cases.


My experience is pretty limited… but I'm sure I've brewed other lager style recipes from ROTM that were fermented at low temps and didn't need that much yeast. But come to think of it a lot of those say to throw in the kit yeast as well.

So you're saying it's about the yeast flavour? I'm looking forward to this one. I think it would be the first light style lager I've tried to make. Only similar thing would be a Bock.

7 Posted: Thursday, February 08, 2018 6:42 AM

It's more that lagers require about double the pitching rate of ales. This is due to the low temps they are generally fermented at, but also helps reduce or eliminate esters which aren't desirable in lagers.

8 Posted: Monday, February 12, 2018 6:19 PM

Hi guys, new to forums and also new to using lager yeast at low temps. I just want to know how long you guys fermented your deuce lager and is it worth putting it in a second fermenter to cold crash? I ask because there looks to be alot of scum in the bottom of 1st fermenter, im guessing due to lager yeast?

9 Posted: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 6:51 AM

I haven't brewed that recipe but I do make a lot of lagers. Usually I ferment at the lower temp for about 5-6 days and then let it rise to 18 degrees until it reaches FG. I leave it a few days longer then drop the temp to cold crash.

I think it's always worth cold crashing a lager, however there isn't any need to transfer it to another fermenter, just do it in the main one. The cold temps will compact that gunk anyway. Not sure why there's “a lot” of it, it wouldn't be the yeast though, I don't get any more sediment with lager yeast than any other yeast.

Last edited by Otto Von Blotto (Tuesday, February 13, 2018 6:51 AM)