1 Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 10:25 PM

In every one of my last 20 batches of brew, irrespective of base kit whether ale, lager, pilsner, I have bottled 6 of the 29 bottles in glass. These are 750ml Coopers Pale Ale bottles.

In every batch the bottled beer has poured similarly to the Pets, and head retention has been similar except that the head is finer out of bottles, and laces down the drinking glass better. I think the taste is slightly more refined also, in all batches.

I know this is subjective, but if I had enough glass, and the cleaning, storage and handling was easier, I would definitely go glass always.

Cheers,

2 Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 10:39 PM

I’m a massive fan of glass.
Not sure whether it’s the inner hippie or not but I would much rather use glass to plastic any day.
Cheers and brew well.
Kirk

3 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 6:49 AM

Yeah me too. I use glass stubbies so on bottling day i fill around 60 bottles, but i dont care. Unlike alot of homebrewers, i enjoy bottling day.

4 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 9:13 AM

Yep, longnecks for me, kegging might be ok for some, I would probably kill myself with kegs….no score card…..
I have used PETs and I think the beer is OK, I have never done any comparisons with glass though, I would have thought it was only mind over matter but I guess it could be so. I just find the pets more inconvenient to use, won't stand up properly when filling or in the fridge, blow all over the place if I leave them on the table outside when I have emptied them, don't seem to cool down as quickly in the fridge (although that might be mind over matter as well) anyway….Longnecks for me.

5 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 9:44 AM

I haven't tried glass myself just due to the workload, and risk of explosions, and having to buy more caps all the time.. But a mate of mine swears that poor/low carbonation in non-kegged beer is often due to the PET bottles, so I'm keen to try to see if that improves my brews.

Rowbrew, I'm keen to try bottling in stubbies, despite the big work load, just so I have a better idea of how much I'm drinking, but what stubbies do you use? Are they resused commercial ones? I was thinking with the thread for the twisties wouldn't that stop you capping them properly?

6 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 12:02 PM

Beervis:

I haven't tried glass myself just due to the workload, and risk of explosions, and having to buy more caps all the time.. But a mate of mine swears that poor/low carbonation in non-kegged beer is often due to the PET bottles, so I'm keen to try to see if that improves my brews.

Rowbrew, I'm keen to try bottling in stubbies, despite the big work load, just so I have a better idea of how much I'm drinking, but what stubbies do you use? Are they resused commercial ones? I was thinking with the thread for the twisties wouldn't that stop you capping them properly?


I keg but bottle about 6 each batch to give to a couple of mates and I use James Squire bottles. They work great!!

Youngie

7 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 7:31 PM

Like Rowbrew, I don't loathe bottling. I find it peaceful and calming. I bottle after I get the kids to bed. Quiet time! I tried bottling once when they were awake and they managed to tip my bottles, causing domino effect. Never again (until they are older)!

Back to bottles. I have used them all. And I nearly have one of every size. The ones I gave away are the 750mL Coopers bottles as it is too much beer in a bottle. I'd rather have a couple of smaller beers but be able to have different batches, rather than 1 big bottle of the one brew.

Stone and Wood bottles used to be solid and fantastic. The newer ones are OK, but nowhere near as strong.

640mL bottles from the LHBS are good, but you might as well buy the, from a bottle shop with local craft brew in them.

Little creatures 568mL imperial pints are also a great size for my drinking habits and pretty strong too.

The 500mL German bottles are a bit thin I find, I'm rotating them out as I get better bottles.

My coveted bottles are the swing tops. Both the grolsch 450mL and the German brown 500mL. Thick glass, solid swingtop and a cinch to seal when bottling. I haven't had any problems with the beer being“skunked” in the green glass because I store all my bottles in covered foam boxes in the dark.

For 330mL giveaways or bringing to a bbq or party, I use whatever I can get my hands on. I think it was headmaster who weighed a whole bunch and found Asahi are the thickest and heaviest of the lot. I've used James squires bottles and fat yak bottles that I have collected from a mate. others have used twist tops with no problems. I think a bench capper is best for twist tops, rather than the twin lever capper.

Cheers,
Jools

8 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 8:43 PM

Plastic does have its advantages with being able to gauge carbonation by the squeeze test. I keg these days but still bottle batches which I think either are enhanced with a secondary carbonation (Saisons and Coopers ale clones) or need to be aged a little (Belgian beers). I have a collection of Coopers 750ml tallies, grolsch swingtops and asahi bottles as they can all withstand a higher carbonation rate. In my early days I used any bottle i could get my hand on including twist tops. They all work fine.

9 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 9:43 PM

Have had a bad run recently with random bottles being flat, have found that the plastic bottles can leak gas but not liquid, what you get is a firm bottle that goes soft after chilling. I kept an eye on these suspect bottles and have found they are now leaking beer out of the bottom ( you can see the fractures around the injection point).
Have since moved to glass and so far so good, consistent carbonation.
If you use Cooper's pet bottles look at the bottom and if it has bulged at the bottom, replace, or at least look for cracks around the feet of the bottle.

10 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 3:37 AM

I bottle in Grolsch bottles. Love them, only wish they were brown instead of green. They are easy to cap and there is no need to constantly buy new caps. Occasionally a silicone seal will have to be replaced, but the original seals last for ages.

I have never bottled in plastic myself, except for the odd squeeze test bottle.

I find beer brewed in glass carboys tastes better than beer brewed in plastic, so I am not surprised to hear that some of you find beer stored in glass bottles tastes better than that stored in plastic. There is probably less oxidation. If you are putting down a stout for aging, glass is definitely the way to go.

Cheers,

Christina.

11 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 7:22 AM

I bought 2000 crown seals ages ago for about $50, surplus brewery stock apparently but I still have most of them because I moved to kegging .

I never used plastic bottles when I was bottling though, it was always glass stubbies (firstly JS ones, then I moved to Sierra ones), so I don't have anything to compare it to on a personal level. I still bottle surplus of some batches if my mini keg is tied up; in fact I was going to do this on Saturday, but the little drill press thing I was gonna use with my capper doesn't have a strong enough handle on it - the force required to crimp the crown seal over the bottle top was causing the handle to bend . I gave up on that and pulled the small keg from the tap, it had been emptied enough to allow me to transfer about 3 and a half litres into it, making that keg a blend of 3 batches now and actually really nice. So at least the surplus didn't get wasted.

12 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 1:27 PM

thanks for the tips everyone, seems like Asahi might be the way to go for 330ml bottles then. I've seen some home brew stores sell them new online, probably good quality but it seems a bit sad spending $30 for 30 bottles when I could spend a bit more and get to drink them as well :P

13 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 2:44 PM

That’s interesting that they would sell empty Asahi bottles, I am surprised to hear that. They are good though, 300g of glass is almost 50% heavier than most that are closer to the low 200g range.

joolbag:

Like Rowbrew, I don't loathe bottling. I find it peaceful and calming. I bottle after I get the kids to bed. Quiet time!


I feel the same way and do the same thing! I usually put on a Brulosophy podcast when I’m sitting down for a bottling session, usually close enough to 10pm at night, tasting a bit of it here and there ?

As I have mentioned before, kegs are useless to me because I brew a lot but give away a lot. If I drank all I brewed, my brain would be quite a bit smaller and I would be on my way to being told I could never have another beer again and have to give up my favourite hobby, or worse.

That means I often need a supply of new bottles as some don’t come back. And it’s more painful if it is one of those bulletproof Asahi’s… But I have managed to convince a few beer fans to drink and harvest Asahi bottles for me. (BTW these all come from China these days, not Japan)

Just about to bottle my first Saison, and will be using these bottles only, as I will be carbing at very high pressure to match the style. Some people bottle this style in Champagne bottles for this reason, using a slightly larger crown seal known as a Tirage cap on them, this crown seal on the champers bottle may be used during the méthode champenoise process I expect. I think they are rated at 5 BAR or 5 volumes of CO2, almost 75psi

Beer bottles usually 3 or less unless closer to 45psi max.

I always bottle a PET for the squeeze test to check on carbonation. Just had my first one fail, was a pinhole crack or hole in one of the feet. Half the beer leaked out under pressure while carbing up in the bottle.

The things to remember with glass are, don’t hurry the process and keep an eye out for things like brett or lacto contaminations.

I leave my brews a good 5 days after they appear to have finished, and wait for the krausen to drop before any cold crashing,

If you suspect a lacto or brett or any other contamination of the whole batch, you will need to take some action as the lacto or brett will keep on fermenting the complex sugars that the brewers yeast could not, and bottle bombs may ensue..

14 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 3:13 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

I bought 2000 crown seals ages ago for about $50….


2000? Where do you keep them all? Or is that a type-o?

Cheers,

Christina.

15 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 6:01 PM

Just to be different, I've always used PET bottles.
I find them light, convenient, they fit nicely in the fridge door, easy to rinse and hang on the bottle tree. Easy to fill, 2 carb drops per bottle, works every time.
Simplicity is the name of the game.

16 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 6:55 PM

1.25L sparkling mineral water bottles from Woolworths.

23L fills around 17-18 of them.

I’ve used some of them for 3 or 4 batches, never had a problem, but I go through enough of the water that I think I’ll just use them once, then cash them in at the refund depot, saves the hassle of cleaning.

I found no discernible difference at all between the plastic and glass in my experience.

I’ll be using plastic until I move to kegs, and I’ll only use glass for gifts.

Cheers

JP

17 Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 9:20 PM

ChristinaS1:

Otto Von Blotto:

I bought 2000 crown seals ages ago for about $50….


2000? Where do you keep them all? Or is that a type-o?

Cheers,

Christina.

They're in a small plastic box. When I say crown seals I'm talking about the caps which are actually what crown seals are, not the bottles that they go on which everyone mistakenly calls crown seals for some reason. I also have about 100 old Coca Cola branded crown seals but I can't find the bloody things at the moment.

18 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 9:21 AM

jackgym:

Just to be different, I've always used PET bottles.
I find them light, convenient, they fit nicely in the fridge door, easy to rinse and hang on the bottle tree. Easy to fill, 2 carb drops per bottle, works every time.
Simplicity is the name of the game.


I like the plastic bottles too, just wish I could find some brown ones that are 330ml/350/375. No problem with the 750's except since I don't drink much these days, I don't want to be stuck with a whole tallie of one batch. Want to be able to have a couple different ones.

I've seen them online at Alibaba and some of those Chinese discount style websites but I'd rather stick to something I can easily get and replace around here, so thinking Asahi sounds like the go to.

19 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 9:23 AM

I'm also thinking, wouldn't it be great to be able to wash the bottles in the dishwasher instead of soaking.. I know the detergent probably isn't the best but I figure I'll run it a second time with no detergent on a short cycle to get rid of any residue.

20 Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 1:36 PM

jackgym:

Just to be different, I've always used PET bottles.
I find them light, convenient, they fit nicely in the fridge door, easy to rinse and hang on the bottle tree. Easy to fill, 2 carb drops per bottle, works every time.
Simplicity is the name of the game.

Not having a go at your choice of using PET bottles but the only difference between glass and PET is that the plastic ones are lighter. Everything else about using bottles is exactly the same with glass bottles. Even more simple with 19 litre stainless steel “bottles”