1 Posted: Saturday, January 27, 2018 4:18 PM

Finally got everything sorted and got my first brew underway
However i have noted my Gravity is 1040…is this right?

2 Posted: Saturday, January 27, 2018 5:39 PM

Yes, No, Maybe

What is the recipe?

3 Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 12:32 PM

PB2:

Yes, No, Maybe

What is the recipe?


Thank You pb2

Its the Coopers pale Ale with the can but used a different malt and dextrose.

What happens if it doesn't have krausen? does that mean the yeast is dead/not working? or should i still leave it the 2 weeks and see what happens?

Sorry about the stupid questions.

Edit: just had a quick peek inside there is a Krausen not too much but it was pitched about 20 hours ago.

4 Posted: Sunday, January 28, 2018 1:34 PM

Hey Peter

How much malt, how much dextrose and what volume did you top up to? these are all important factors when working out your OG.
e.g.
23 litres
1.7 kg Coopers Pale Ale kit
500g Light Dry Malt
500g Dextrose
OG = 1,039

The height of the Krausen will vary from brew to brew and is normally at its maximum at around 30 hours. Some yeasts have longer lag times so this is only a general rule of thumb. Condensation is also a sign of fermentation. If you get concerned at the 48 hour mark take an SG sample.

Cheers & Beers
Scottie
Valley Brew

5 Posted: Saturday, February 03, 2018 3:42 PM

Hi guys,

One week in and a gravity check its around 1.010. which puts it at the 3.8% mark.

Not too bad for a first brew. It seems a bit bitter (and it has the homebrew taste, which is un-avoidable) though does this even out whilst its bottle conditioning. I know it has another week left in it before bottling and then I heard that it's 2 weeks to bottle condition or is the 3 week mark better?

6 Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 12:19 AM

Peter_1983:

Hi guys,

One week in and a gravity check its around 1.010. which puts it at the 3.8% mark.

Not too bad for a first brew. It seems a bit bitter (and it has the homebrew taste, which is un-avoidable) though does this even out whilst its bottle conditioning. I know it has another week left in it before bottling and then I heard that it's 2 weeks to bottle condition or is the 3 week mark better?


Hi Peter,

i usually Give it at least 2 weeks before tasting….Then after 1 month it really starts tasting good. Once you start adding stuff like malt, hops, grains etc you'll be quite surprised and wont notice the “homebrew” taste no where near as much.

By my calculations it will be around 3.9% but then you need to add .5 to it for bottle conditioning, so around 4.4%

Cheers,
Hoppy

7 Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 12:34 AM

Hoppy:

Hi Peter,

i usually Give it at least 2 weeks before tasting….Then after 1 month it really starts tasting good. Once you start adding stuff like malt, hops, grains etc you'll be quite surprised and wont notice the “homebrew” taste no where near as much.

By my calculations it will be around 3.9% but then you need to add .5 to it for bottle conditioning, so around 4.4%

Cheers,
Hoppy


Thank you Hoppy,

Do you leave it fermenting for a month? or is that the time in the bottle?

I am doing a kit at the moment to see how ‘easy’ it can be and then I will go on from there regarding grains hops etc, no doubt I'll be asking for a lot more guidance along the way.

Cheers

Pete

8 Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 5:57 AM

I usually ferment for 3 weeks in a temperature controlled fridge at 18°c for ales or 11°c for lagers, Then i bottle and leave them for a couple of weeks before i test taste then after a month they're usually good to go.

Cheers,
Hoppy

9 Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 6:41 AM

It's one month in the bottle. I found the same thing, most batches other than ones that benefit from long term ageing were pretty much at their best after a month or so.

I have no real rigid timeframes on time spent in the fermenter though. I just leave it for about 4 days after it reaches FG and then it can either be bottled or cold crashed for a week first. If it reaches FG in 4 days for instance, then you can be bottling after 8-9-10 days total in the FV. Bugger waiting an extra week and a half for nothing simply to adhere to a rigid 3-weeks-in-the-FV timeframe.

My ales usually sit in the FV for about 16-17 days because I give them a week cold crashing before I keg them. Without the cold crash they'd be in the keg after 9 or 10 days.

Cheers

Kelsey

10 Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 6:19 PM

I finally bottled my first batch and cleaned everything up. Now i have been storing all my brewstuff in the spare bedroom (much to the displeasure of the better half)

Where do you guys store your brewstuff if it isn't being used?

11 Posted: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 7:10 AM

In a spare bedroom too. It also contains the computer, my brewing fridge and some other bits and pieces. I actually hate it being there because I have to carry shit out to the kitchen or laundry or wherever I'm brewing… at least when it's in a garage/laundry it doesn't have to really be moved very far.

Normally, I would have all my brewing gear and so forth in the garage but this house doesn't have one, or any useful area underneath it. It is a high set house, but underneath it is just dirt, not enclosed or lockable and there are no power points down there. If I owned it I'd be concreting that shit, enclosing the area and making it a lock up situation with power, and moving the laundry down there instead of it being upstairs where it is now.

12 Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 10:31 AM

Thank you. I have decided to put it in the shed not the best place but it keeps it out the way

Otto the plans you have for the house sound amazing.

13 Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:38 PM

Yeah, too bad the owners most likely wouldn't be bothered to do it. It would definitely improve it if they did though.

Last edited by Otto Von Blotto (Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:38 PM)