1 Posted: Saturday, January 13, 2018 2:09 PM

OK so I've had various suggestions from, ‘you don’t have to squeeze hop tea bags when dry hopping' to ‘I always do it and it makes a difference’.

Last brew I have the bag a bit of a squeeze (with sterilised disposable latex glove) and there was not issue.

This time one bag split and some of the hops spilled out into the brew. Most of the contents of the bag are still in the bag.

My question is; what is the likelihood of the particles joining the yeast at the bottom of bottles after bottling? If not, if they are floating I guess I could always use a sterilised strainer and scoop the particles out.

Any ideas?

2 Posted: Saturday, January 13, 2018 3:21 PM

What stage are you at? Never used hop tea bags but I would just proceed as normal. Given people dry hop commando, I can't see it being a big deal.

If you were super concerned you could cold crash to get it to settle I guess, but I wouldn't worry since you said most of it is still in the teabag.

3 Posted: Saturday, January 13, 2018 11:37 PM

Beerinberra:

What stage are you at? Never used hop tea bags but I would just proceed as normal. Given people dry hop commando, I can't see it being a big deal.

If you were super concerned you could cold crash to get it to settle I guess, but I wouldn't worry since you said most of it is still in the teabag.


Well now it seems to be starting to disperse out of the bag and float on the surface.

I guess that could possibly be no concern for bottling.

However I did plan to harvest some the slurry for the next brew.

4 Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 8:17 AM

DonPolo:

However I did plan to harvest some the slurry for the next brew.


I'm pretty sure it's been mentioned before. You shouldn't have a worry collected the yeast despite it having some hops matter in it.

5 Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 3 PM

Graculus:

DonPolo:

However I did plan to harvest some the slurry for the next brew.


I'm pretty sure it's been mentioned before. You shouldn't have a worry collected the yeast despite it having some hops matter in it.


Ok so it looks like the hop particles are floating so should not be a big issue for bottling. However it looks like there will be particles in the slurry. Hopefully that’s OK.

I might try scooping most of them up with a spoon or a sieve or something that has been sterilised

6 Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 9:10 PM

DonPolo:

Graculus:

DonPolo:

However I did plan to harvest some the slurry for the next brew.


I'm pretty sure it's been mentioned before. You shouldn't have a worry collected the yeast despite it having some hops matter in it.


Ok so it looks like the hop particles are floating so should not be a big issue for bottling. However it looks like there will be particles in the slurry. Hopefully that’s OK.

I might try scooping most of them up with a spoon or a sieve or something that has been sterilised


I wouldn't worry trying to pick the hops out. As I said I'm sure it's been mentioned on here before that a bit of hops on the slurry isn't a problem.

Maybe get one of these for next time is you're worried. This is what I use
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Stainless-Steel-Mesh-Ball-Tea-Leaf-Strainer-Infuser-Filter-Diffuser-BD-/182203099836?var=&hash=item2a6c26aabc
get the XXL one.

7 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 9:13 AM

Graculus:

Maybe get one of these for next time is you're worried. This is what I use
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Stainless-Steel-Mesh-Ball-Tea-Leaf-Strainer-Infuser-Filter-Diffuser-BD-/182203099836?var=&hash=item2a6c26aabc
get the XXL one.


Yes it would probably be good insurance. The pellets in the tea bag have now pretty much all flowed out of the bag and appear to be floating on the surface. They are no longer pellets but have disintegrated into a green sludge.

I'll just bottle down to the surface and see how it goes.

I've never used slurry before to start a brew so it will be interesting to see how that turns out.

8 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 9:22 AM


Bought the XXL one.

9 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:01 AM

I have a few of those tea strainer balls, also the XXL size. They seem to be able to hold about 50-60g of hops without them getting squashed up inside it, maybe could push it to 70g. I've only used them once so far (upgraded from smaller ones) in a pale ale that is on tap now and the aroma is excellent. I used two in that batch with Citra in one of them and a mix of Chinook and Simcoe in the other, just to use up some leftovers and clear out some freezer space. I didn't weigh them but a rough guess would have about 50-60g in each. Plenty of space for the hops to swim around in. The other advantage is that you can buy hops in larger amounts which is a lot cheaper than those teabag type things.

It's not ideal having hop matter in yeast slurry but for one batch you shouldn't really have any problems.

10 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 12:59 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

I have a few of those tea strainer balls, also the XXL size. They seem to be able to hold about 50-60g of hops without them getting squashed up inside it, maybe could push it to 70g. I've only used them once so far (upgraded from smaller ones) in a pale ale that is on tap now and the aroma is excellent. I used two in that batch with Citra in one of them and a mix of Chinook and Simcoe in the other, just to use up some leftovers and clear out some freezer space. I didn't weigh them but a rough guess would have about 50-60g in each. Plenty of space for the hops to swim around in. The other advantage is that you can buy hops in larger amounts which is a lot cheaper than those teabag type things.

It's not ideal having hop matter in yeast slurry but for one batch you shouldn't really have any problems.


Yes I think it will be much better and cheaper now that I'm routinely dry hopping. It hadn't dawned on me until I started putting two or three teabags in that it does turn out to be relatively expensive at $5 per 12g teabag when to can pick up 100g for around $10. This is relatively high investment when you've only paid $12 for the kit and $8.00 for the LDM.

Am I right to assume you use hop pellets rather than the actual hop flowers for dry hopping?

11 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 1:57 PM

I use hop pellets yes. I use them for pretty much all my brewing, the only time I use flowers is when I've picked some off the bines in my backyard (or the olds' backyard now). I just put a batch into the fermenter using these flowers but undecided on whether I'll dry hop with them or not.

12 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 5:40 PM

you could maybe use just the hops with no bag, but then use a tea strainer, if your mum is not looking

13 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:38 PM

Well they’re bottled now. Will be interesting. On the 13th bottle the bottling wand got clogged from the hops and stopped pouring. The first bottles seemed to be fine though.

I could have continued without the wand and maybe got another’ half bottle but couldn’t be bothered. It will be interesting to see what effect having hops in the bottle will turn out.

The slurry does have hops in it.

About how much slurry should I used in the next batch of 11 litres?

There wasn’t that big a deposit at the bottom of the FV. Maybe less than a cup now in a sterilised jar in the fridge


14 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 6:37 AM

Just tip the whole contents of the jar into the next batch. You only need to scoop up about a third of the yeast cake for re-pitching. If you take the whole thing you'd be over pitching by quite a bit.

15 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 9:48 AM

Otto Von Blotto:

Just tip the whole contents of the jar into the next batch. You only need to scoop up about a third of the yeast cake for re-pitching. If you take the whole thing you'd be over pitching by quite a bit.


Well see that's the point. My batch was 11 litres so in reality there wasn't much of a yeast cake at all. I'd say about a centimetre at the bottom of a jar that is about 10cm across. I tipped out the remaining hop-filled beer then took my sterilised big spoon and put most of what was left into the jar.

I don't have the jar in front of me now but I think I have the dimensions pretty much right.

16 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 12:36 PM

That's my point, it doesn't matter what the size of the batch is, the yeast will multiply to the required numbers to ferment it, but these numbers are far too many to be pitching into a fresh batch of similar size and OG. You'll be ok, but maybe try taking half of it next time.

17 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 1 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

That's my point, it doesn't matter what the size of the batch is, the yeast will multiply to the required numbers to ferment it, but these numbers are far too many to be pitching into a fresh batch of similar size and OG. You'll be ok, but maybe try taking half of it next time.


Ta. In another post it Scottie suggested that 500 ml of yeast slurry would be right. If that is right then I could measure out 250 ml. No need to over pitch.

18 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 1:11 PM

It probably wouldn't be an issue, it really depends on how thick the slurry is, because that determines how many cells per mL there are in it. I wouldn't use 2 or 3 litres of water to mix it up though, that's too much for a small size batch like that. 1 litre would be enough.

This is one reason I don't like using fermenter trub for yeast because you don't really know how much you're pitching. I suspect anywhere between 250-350mL would be alright though.

19 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 1:37 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

It probably wouldn't be an issue, it really depends on how thick the slurry is, because that determines how many cells per mL there are in it. I wouldn't use 2 or 3 litres of water to mix it up though, that's too much for a small size batch like that. 1 litre would be enough.

This is one reason I don't like using fermenter trub for yeast because you don't really know how much you're pitching. I suspect anywhere between 250-350mL would be alright though.


Oh I happy to rehydrate new dried yeast but I got the impression that using the fermenter trub was preferable. Or perhaps just a. uses the same yeast as the first half of the can b. is a bit cheaper.

In the end the taste of the beer is the main thing. All interesting.

I'll definitely try using the slurry this time though.

20 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 3:01 PM

In your case, if you continue with using half the kit each brew, it would be advantageous using the slurry every second batch because that way you can re-hydrate the kit yeast for the first batch, and use some of the cake for the second batch instead of having to go and buy another packet of yeast. So it would work out cheaper.

Alternatively you could keep reusing a portion of the cake over 4 or 5 batches, and simply save the unopened kit yeasts in the fridge for a later date. Choice is yours mate.