1 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 12:53 PM

Been brewing for a bit now, currently on my 11th Batch and SWMBO is getting a bit sick of empty bottles skulking around the kitchen in the drain sink etc.
Does anybody have the same issues, I'm looking at cutting come holes in an old plastic food storage container lid and using that as a bottle drying rack so to speak for the Friday night 6 pack clean up.
Putting the bottle tree on display 24/7 in the kitchen has been banned.

What do you all do for you bottle clean ups as you go.

Cheers.
Andy.

2 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:11 PM

When finishing a bottle, rinse a couple of times then fill with water overnight.
Leave in the Laundry then next morning drain, then store with lid on in the spare room cupboard.
Ready for next round of cleaning - Napisan soak, rinse, spray with Starsan and drying on bottle tree.
As far as SWMBO goes, out of sight (of the kitchen), out of mind - less headaches for me!!

Cheers

James

3 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:23 PM

hey mate

In the interests of a conflict-free kitchen (and a tidy one as I do most of the cooking), I have a process. I wash the bottles out the night that I drink and then store them upside down in a dish draining rack or propped up against the splashback. This allows all of the water to drain out.

In the morning, I put the bottles upright to allow the condensation to evapourate.

That evening I put the bottles away into my storage boxes (which for me is under the house). An old mate brewer got me onto using foam broccoli boxes with the foam lids loosely on (so moisture can escape). These boxes hold 21 x bottles (I use 450ml Grolsch, 500mL and 568mL bottles).

No bottles littering up my benchtops and my bottles are clean, dry and packed away within 24hours of drinking. Doesn't take much effort at all.

Good luck!

4 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:33 PM

I used to put the empties into 6 pack holders after being rinsed. When a holder filled up, it was taken downstairs to the laundry and stored in an old beer carton and a new empty holder was brought upstairs, and the process repeated. There was only ever one 6 pack on the bench at any time so it didn't really take up much space.

I found an old wine rack on the side of the road one day, and used it to make a bottle drying rack with a couple of pieces of pine. 24 holes were drilled in each piece, the pieces were varnished and then glued together, and then attached to the wine rack. This sat downstairs in the laundry or garage as well.

Not long after that, I started kegging and had little need for bottles anymore. I still occasionally bottle batch surplus if my 10L keg is still on tap (or it's a lager batch), but the volume of bottles is obviously significantly reduced now.

Cheers

Kelsey

5 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:14 PM

Switch to kegging = no more bottles.

Cheers,

Lusty.

6 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:29 PM

Beerlust:

Switch to kegging = no more bottles.

Cheers,

Lusty.


+1

7 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:48 PM

I have also started using broccoli boxes, insulate the bottles well when conditioning as well. I also leave the bottles overnight soaking, wash out the next day and pack away, not too many bottles out unless to was a good night!

8 Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 10:07 AM

My Mrs complains as well. I just rinse them a couple times. Luckily, I kept an old pet cage I used when our dog was a puppy and it's come in handy. Once I rinse the bottles I take them outside and sit them upside down on the pet cage to drain. The neck of the bottles fit perfectly between the wire rows of the cage and it works as a makeshift drainer. Its down the side of the house where she never goes so out of sight out of mind. Once dry I store them in an old Esky or storage containers in the shed until I need to clean/sanitise for the next batch. It's been interesting using things around the house when brewing. When bottling I use the bottom rack of my dishwasher to stand the bottles upside down after being sanitised. Works well. Much cheaper and easier to pack up than a bottling tree.

9 Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 5:43 PM

Oh they fixed the login.

I just keep the empties as is (closed, filthy) until I can be bothered washing them. I reckon it's only mostly yeast in there so it can do what it likes and probably isn't a bad thing, as it will kill other microbes. I have never and won't voluntarily use chemicals. Just say no.

The strongest thing I have ever used was white vinegar, swoosh a couple of times and rinse with dihydrogen monoxide. I've done 10 brews now and zero problemo.

I chuck empties recklessly into a box or a milk crate so they're out of the way. That means anywhere, but in a box or crate. You can move this around if she gets twitchy.

Then when I feel like washing them I will rinse the daylights out of them under a cold tap. Usually this means opening them up and doing the inside too. If I'm feeling wierd and paranoid I'll use vinegar.

Then they are bunged into a milk crate, lids off (lids kept together face up to dry in the sun for an arvo, then chucked in a drawer), and tilted at a slight angle so they will drain but not collect vapour in the top bit. A day or two and they're dry and ready to go.

Do you get to ban her from doing stuff she finds enjoyable too, or is it just how it is.

Lusty, how do you switch to kegging?

10 Posted: Saturday, January 13, 2018 12:50 PM

I rinse after drinking and pop into a black plastic bucket (handy pail). When it is full of empty bottles I fill with sodium perc solution to soak. They then get rinsed the next morning and go onto my Fastrack to dry and then back into my bottle cupboard in the kitchenette.

Cheers,

John

11 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 9:26 PM

Me Old Mate:

Oh they fixed the login.

I just keep the empties as is (closed, filthy) until I can be bothered washing them. I reckon it's only mostly yeast in there so it can do what it likes and probably isn't a bad thing, as it will kill other microbes. I have never and won't voluntarily use chemicals. Just say no.

The strongest thing I have ever used was white vinegar, swoosh a couple of times and rinse with dihydrogen monoxide. I've done 10 brews now and zero problemo.

Then they are bunged into a milk crate, lids off (lids kept together face up to dry in the sun for an arvo, then chucked in a drawer), and tilted at a slight angle so they will drain but not collect vapour in the top bit. A day or two and they're dry and ready to go.

Do you get to ban her from doing stuff she finds enjoyable too, or is it just how it is.

Lusty, how do you switch to kegging?

Having left empties with sediment in them before, I wouldn't recommend it. The shit goes mouldy after a while. Unfortunately the yeast doesn't kill other microbes; in an empty bottle stored at room temp scenario, the yeast gradually dies and allows other microbes to take over. It also makes it a lot more of a pain in the arse to clean them compared to rinsing them out as soon as they're emptied.

I also suspect that without using any cleaners on your bottles that after a while they will build up a cloudy residue inside them. Mine did when I only ever rinsed them with hot water. It probably won't cause any problems but it makes them look pretty grotty.

Sodium percarbonate (active ingredient in Napisan) is a decent cleaning chemical that is also pretty much harmless in the ways we use it, breaking down into oxygen and sodium carbonate when it dissolves in water. It cleans well and rinses off easily. It is a bleach, but it's a lot safer than sodium hypochlorite bleach, and doesn't leave that awful odour behind either. I use it to clean my beer glasses too and they come up sparkling. Vinegar and water are also chemicals; there's no need to be worried about chemicals per se, all it needs is a little understanding of what's safe and what isn't. Every chemical has a lethal dose, even water will kill you if you drink too much of it at once (or obviously inhale it).

Cheers

Kelsey

12 Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 10:51 AM

Hi Me Old Mate.

Me Old Mate:

Lusty, how do you switch to kegging?

A couple of recent threads…

Kegging Advice

Start Up Cost For Kegging

Cheers,

Lusty.

13 Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 5:19 PM

i give them a rinse as i drink & let them sit on the sink till next day - the cook & i grew apart & thought we'd be better off each on our own so i don't have that issue to worry about. as far as storage, i got some empty plastic 20 litre ice cream tubs from a local cafe - they hold 9 stubbies each & are nice & stable stacked 3 or 4 high

14 Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 11:03 PM

Hey Smitdog88, I reckon rinse the bottles each night and leave them on your sink until youre done for the night, then take them all outside before going to bed and put them on your tree.

15 Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 10:57 AM

Beerlust:

Hi Me Old Mate.

Me Old Mate:

Lusty, how do you switch to kegging?

A couple of recent threads…

Kegging Advice

Start Up Cost For Kegging

Cheers,

Lusty.


Cheers Sir!

16 Posted: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 9:03 PM

Ok I've sorted out my bottles problem.
taking a bit from you all. I now find it easiest to rinse as soon as i have poured my brew.
I have moved some things around in the laundry ad that is now my homebrew washing haven.
Only time the kitchen and homebrew come together is on brew days.
i have a dedicated bottle drainboard (one of those dividers found in large eskis is what i am using,
and then the next day or whenever they are dry enough i place the dry empty into the carton which is under the bench.
When said carton is full, take load of empties to the shed and replace with empty box.
Easy peasy and should work well.

And yes me old mate, my side of the sink in the bathroom is mine, and is banned from any of her hobby things. (hair stuff and the like).
so it does go both ways. fair question.

Also a batch of hard lemonade every now and then keeps the hobby in the good books, hahahaha.
cheers.

Last edited by Smitdog88 (Tuesday, January 23, 2018 9:03 PM)