1 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 12:42 PM

Hi (again). On Sunday I bottled my “back to basics & n stuff up another brew” Draught.

As usual tasted ok before bottling. I have no room left to store 30 bottles so left 15 of them in my brew fridge and set the Inkbird to 22 degrees as I believe 18+ is ok.

I checked the bottles today and all but a few are still fairly “soft”, the other 1/4 are very tight. I opened one tight one (test beer, to see if it smells off like nearly every other beer I've done and it spewed out from ye yonder. I've never had that happen before.

Anyway main concern is why most bottles are not firm like they usually are within 2 days (it's now 4 days) and some are. All are bottled to around the same level, so 3-5 cm from top of bottle. Normally I have been around 5cm. Stock standard kit & BE2 used. 20 litres of water from Woolies. Yes I did add carb drops (2) to each bottle ;-)

Cheers from the land of “what in the hell am I doing wrong??!!”


2 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:39 PM

4 days is pretty early to be worrying about carbonation not working. Give them another couple of weeks.

The bottle spewing out - did you open it warm or cold?

3 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:44 PM

You mean you bottled three days ago? I let mine carbonate for three weeks. If temps are warm the sugar may be fermented in a few days, but it takes time for the gas to be reabsorbed.

Also, best to chill the bottles for a couple of days before opening. That should reduce the gushing when you open.

I don't quite understand your bottling set up; 5cm seems like a lot of headspace. Are you using a bottling wand? They usually fill the bottle to the perfect level.

Cheers,

Christina.

4 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:37 PM

if you used a lager yeast it would take a bit longer than normal to carb up.

5 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:50 PM

Relax and wait a couple of weeks. I certainly wouldn't be opening a bottle after a couple of days - waste of beer.

Are you absolutely sure you carb dropped every bottle? Last time I bottled i kept almost forgetting. Caught myself everytime but easy to do.

6 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 9:22 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

4 days is pretty early to be worrying about carbonation not working. Give them another couple of weeks.

The bottle spewing out - did you open it warm or cold?


Oops, accidentally sent a report to moderator, unintentional.

I was only curious because all the other brews I've done seem to have been with tight bottles within a couple of days. Otherwise I'd not really be bothered to be honest. Warm bottles (around 22 degrees give or take.

ChristinaS1:

You mean you bottled three days ago? I let mine carbonate for three weeks. If temps are warm the sugar may be fermented in a few days, but it takes time for the gas to be reabsorbed.

Also, best to chill the bottles for a couple of days before opening. That should reduce the gushing when you open.

I don't quite understand your bottling set up; 5cm seems like a lot of headspace. Are you using a bottling wand? They usually fill the bottle to the perfect level.

Cheers,

Christina.


Probably more like 3cm, only a guestimate. I used the Coopers tube if that's what you mean re wand Christina but I've got to lift it out for the pour to stop…and need to flick the FV tap off manually as the tube leaks badly.

CaffeinatedSentryGnome:

if you used a lager yeast it would take a bit longer than normal to carb up.


Used the stock yeast that came with it. Assuming it's an Ale yeast though?

Beerinberra:

Relax and wait a couple of weeks. I certainly wouldn't be opening a bottle after a couple of days - waste of beer.

Are you absolutely sure you carb dropped every bottle? Last time I bottled i kept almost forgetting. Caught myself everytime but easy to do.


Yes dropped two in every bottle, to ensure I don't forget I always put two in my hand while the bottle is filling up.

7 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:22 PM

SirDrinksalot:

Yes dropped two in every bottle, to ensure I don't forget I always put two in my hand while the bottle is filling up.


Actually I have wondered if I had risked infection of the brew by fishing the carb drops out of the packet with my bare fingers.

8 Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:10 PM

I used to use carb drops just with bare fingers without issue. Anyway, opening warm bottles will cause them to gush every time. The CO2 is coming out of solution far quicker at 22C or whatever than it will if the beer is chilled properly in the fridge.

Also, the amount of headspace makes bugger all if any difference to the carbonation level of the beer. I've done bottles with different amounts of headspace, some up to half the bottle (experimentation that one), and they all ended up at the same carbonation to my palate.

9 Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 10:06 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

I used to use carb drops just with bare fingers without issue. Anyway, opening warm bottles will cause them to gush every time. The CO2 is coming out of solution far quicker at 22C or whatever than it will if the beer is chilled properly in the fridge.

Also, the amount of headspace makes bugger all if any difference to the carbonation level of the beer. I've done bottles with different amounts of headspace, some up to half the bottle (experimentation that one), and they all ended up at the same carbonation to my palate.


I've going to leave the brew as is for another 7-14 days. Given my past failings trying to brew something drinkable, I have a “test” bottle and decided to pour a beer from it - thank goodness it is not infected like half of my previous 4 efforts!!! Tastes ok, so will be very drinkable (as far as Draught can be lol) soon. Finally, I may have sussed out the skills of doing a very basic brew!

10 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 6:39 AM

FYI, “draught” is not a style of beer, it's just a serving method, i.e. from a keg. Any beer that is served from a keg is draught beer, but the big breweries with their marketing spin have managed to con most of the public into thinking it's a specific style of beer.

11 Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 10:19 AM

G'day SirDrinksalot.

I'm glad to hear you look to have a drinkable beer this time around. This was inevitable with some persistence.

While you're waiting for this brew to age & carb up, start another brew going. This is how you begin the cycle of having beer aged adequately by the time you're ready to drink them.

Continue to be diligent with your cleaning, sanitation, & brew day methods, & good quality home brewed beer will continue to flow at the SirDrinksalot brewery.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

12 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:24 AM

Otto Von Blotto:

FYI, “draught” is not a style of beer, it's just a serving method, i.e. from a keg. Any beer that is served from a keg is draught beer, but the big breweries with their marketing spin have managed to con most of the public into thinking it's a specific style of beer.


So what would you brand it as then do you reckon Otta? I did read recently that Draught isn't an actual style but it does (to me) have a certain smell/after taste (draught in general) so don't know what you'll really call it if not Draught. In any event I'll be heading back to Pale Ale next or the ROTM I've got, now that my success rate is up from 33% to 60% now lol (3 ok, 2 dead on arrival).

Beerlust:

G'day SirDrinksalot.

I'm glad to hear you look to have a drinkable beer this time around. This was inevitable with some persistence.

While you're waiting for this brew to age & carb up, start another brew going. This is how you begin the cycle of having beer aged adequately by the time you're ready to drink them.

Continue to be diligent with your cleaning, sanitation, & brew day methods, & good quality home brewed beer will continue to flow at the SirDrinksalot brewery.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.


Cheers Lusty, as above, Draught a bit green still but ok. I'm letting it age for another few weeks. Amber Ale has lost a lot of bitterness in the last week si not bad at all now. Yes finally, having some wins.

Yep, going to start the ROTM Gold Rush Summer Ale or Pale Ale (& maybe dry hop the latter) on the weekend. By the time it's ready, I should have a few emergency beers still bottles from the Amber and Draught stash :) I'm with you, re having another brew on the go while one is aging.

I must be on the right track re cleaning/sanitising etc now, 2 beers in a row have actually worked.

13 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 6:55 AM

I think the draught kit is designed to emulate the usual draught beers (i.e. megaswill) found in Australia, although it is more bitter than most of them these days. Maybe a bit of a nod to yesteryear as I've tasted a couple of beers still being brewed that were around back then and they had more bitterness than today's garbage.

14 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:17 AM

Otto Von Blotto:

I think the draught kit is designed to emulate the usual draught beers (i.e. megaswill) found in Australia, although it is more bitter than most of them these days. Maybe a bit of a nod to yesteryear as I've tasted a couple of beers still being brewed that were around back then and they had more bitterness than today's garbage.


So would the ‘Draft’, as is marketed in kits just be ‘Beer’ (and/or megaswill if you like)? Not an ale or a lager or something else?

Obviously I'm not talking about a beer that is ‘served from a keg’ but the beer sold both in bottles/cans (like Toohey's draft) and those from a kit.

15 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:49 PM

I reckon you'll find most of the beers labelled as “Draught” are actually Lagers, from mainstream Aussie brewers that is.

When you brew the Coopers kit you are brewing an Ale unless you go out and purchase a Lager yeast. If you do this, and use a dextrose LDM mix, ferment at 12 degrees and keg it I reckon you'll have a Draught that is comparable to what's on tap at your local. If you do it with an Ale yeast. use all malt, a spec grain and some hops I reckon you'll have something better.

With a 60% hit rate SDAL needs to get another brew down or change his forum handle to #Sirusedtodrinkalot.

Cheers & Beers
Scottie
Valley Brew

16 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:53 PM

Well it's always gonna be an ale or lager as they are the main two forms of beer, all other styles are substyles of ale or lager, but essentially yes pretty much megaswill is what that kit is aimed at producing. Also you likely won't find it called “draft” here unless it's imported from America.

I actually had a couple of cans of Tooheys “Draught” recently, I don't know whether or not it's a different brew to New, but it tasted better than the last time I had a New.

17 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:49 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

Well it's always gonna be an ale or lager as they are the main two forms of beer, all other styles are substyles of ale or lager, but essentially yes pretty much megaswill is what that kit is aimed at producing. Also you likely won't find it called “draft” here unless it's imported from America.

I actually had a couple of cans of Tooheys “Draught” recently, I don't know whether or not it's a different brew to New, but it tasted better than the last time I had a New.


My dad was a Tooheys man. So much so that my second dog was named “Toohey” ; a little fox terrier. Dad would never THINK of drinking a beer from that ‘other brewer’ in NSW (they that cannot be named - in his presence anyway). I actually don't mind their pilsner in a pinch.

Actually his go to drop at the pub was a ‘New with a dash of Old’. Me and the boys developed a liking for Tooheys Old on tap down at the local the rowing club. We thought it was because they kept their gear so clean. Many of the boys swore that you never got a hangover on Tooheys Old; can't remember if that was true in my case but it was a good story. Maybe because it was less carbonated than the new.

I remembered reading an article by a brewer from Tooheys that said you should never drink beer directly from a can or a bottle but decant it to a glass. He suggested that it was the consumption of excess CO2 that was to blame for a large part of a hangover (as well as the alcohol of course). Never heard this advice again. Perhaps it was just an educated guess on his part.

18 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 2:53 PM

I'm not sure about the ‘excess’ CO2 resulting in more of a hangover or not but in any case it is good advice to drink from a glass rather than directly from the can or bottle. The reason for it is more about taste though.

Most of our taste is from smell, and you can't get much of an aroma when the can or bottle opening is covered - that's why you often hear megaswill drinkers say it “tastes better on tap”; it's nothing to do with it being on tap and everything to do with them drinking it from a glass instead of a bottle or can, because it's the exact same beer. I've noticed it with home brews too, occasionally I have drunk them straight from the bottle and they always taste worse than pouring them into a glass and drinking from that.

19 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:04 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

I'm not sure about the ‘excess’ CO2 resulting in more of a hangover or not but in any case it is good advice to drink from a glass rather than directly from the can or bottle. The reason for it is more about taste though.

Most of our taste is from smell, and you can't get much of an aroma when the can or bottle opening is covered - that's why you often hear megaswill drinkers say it “tastes better on tap”; it's nothing to do with it being on tap and everything to do with them drinking it from a glass instead of a bottle or can, because it's the exact same beer. I've noticed it with home brews too, occasionally I have drunk them straight from the bottle and they always taste worse than pouring them into a glass and drinking from that.


Very wise words of course, there is more surface area, makes sense. Ever since I read that article, probably more than 30 years ago, I have poured beers into a glass. It has actually annoyed me when offering a glass to people when they say “no that's OK it is already in glass” i.e. the bottle.

After spending time in Germany, I am more likely to use a large red wine glass these days than a normal or pilsener glass - just my preference (I don't have any German style beer glasses). But of course as you pointed out it probably also enhances the whole sensory experience.

20 Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:09 PM

Or you get those other clowns who mock you for pouring it into a glass… “Oh you just gotta be more posh than the rest of us huh” or whatever. No dickhead, it tastes better, maybe you should try it