1 Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 10:58 AM

I recently created a ginger brew from scratch. I used raw ginger, raw sugar and combined techniques from a few recipes I liked from the internet.

The OG was about 1060. It got stuck around 1030 so I bottled about half of it and let the other half keep working. The second half is now at about 1016. I'm thinking it is ready to bottle as the fermentation is VERY slow right now.

My question is: Add sugar or not? If so, should I add cane sugar or dextrose? I've never tried dextrose with any of my non-grain brews before.

Thanks

2 Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 1:53 PM

No real difference between cane sugar or dextrose for priming. If it is finished fermenting you need to add sugar. If it has a couple of points to go, may get away without it.

You do need to make sure it has finished before bottling. Am concerned at the half you have bottled at 1030 seeing the other half continue to 1016. Bombs waiting to happen there. Will need to ease the pressure - undo/recap, or it is likely to get messy.

3 Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 8:46 PM

Hi Dozer,

Thanks for the response and advice.

To give you more of the info I left out before, I bottled the first bit of ginger brew at 1030 because the yeast had separated out and I had racked the clear liquid into a separate container. I watched the ferment for several days and the SG didn't move. There was also an absence of any visible actions such as bubbles. I have been checking the bottles (plastic) and they are very mildly carbonated. It is still easy to squeeze the bottles. Also, I have made non-alcoholic ginger brew many times and those bottles can get heavily carbonated so I do know what I am looking for with over-carbonation.

To the portion of the brew that I did not bottle I added some of the yeast back and the SG has been slowly dropping. It is so slow that I'm not sure when it could possibly be finished thus the question about adding sugar or not. Basically, is it finished or just stalled?

I was also wondering about flavor of one sugar versus another when used in priming. In the past I have noticed a cidery flavour when using cane sugar for carbonation in beer. Would dextrose produce an unwanted flavour in this instance?

I have also noticed bubble size variations in different brewed beverages. I was wondering if this is due to yeast strain, sugar type, or another factor.

Thanks,
James

4 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:27 AM

jda:

Hi Dozer,

Thanks for the response and advice.

To give you more of the info I left out before, I bottled the first bit of ginger brew at 1030 because the yeast had separated out and I had racked the clear liquid into a separate container. I watched the ferment for several days and the SG didn't move. There was also an absence of any visible actions such as bubbles. I have been checking the bottles (plastic) and they are very mildly carbonated. It is still easy to squeeze the bottles. Also, I have made non-alcoholic ginger brew many times and those bottles can get heavily carbonated so I do know what I am looking for with over-carbonation.

To the portion of the brew that I did not bottle I added some of the yeast back and the SG has been slowly dropping. It is so slow that I'm not sure when it could possibly be finished thus the question about adding sugar or not. Basically, is it finished or just stalled?


Depends on your recipe. If there is malt in it, best to punch your recipe and yeast into a recipe calculator to know what FG to expect. If you only used sugar, then your FG could be ~1.000, or even a little lower.

jda:

I was also wondering about flavor of one sugar versus another when used in priming. In the past I have noticed a cidery flavour when using cane sugar for carbonation in beer. Would dextrose produce an unwanted flavour in this instance?

I have also noticed bubble size variations in different brewed beverages. I was wondering if this is due to yeast strain, sugar type, or another factor.

Thanks,
James


I have also noticed that table sugar seems to give slightly larger bubbles than dextrose, but it doesn't make much difference. I use table sugar now as it is cheaper. If your brew tastes cidery, it probably has more to do with using sugar in your main recipe, or sampling too early. Priming sugar is too small an amount to have any impact on flavour.

Cheers,

Christina.

Last edited by ChristinaS1 (Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:27 AM)