1 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 3:07 PM

Looking to do a Red IPA,

Would like it to use NZ Nelson Sauvin, Pacifica, Cascade, Fuggles Hops to mimick a beer I like by Harringtons NZ,

Harringtons Classy Red

I would say 100% they use Gladfields grain if that help with what to use.

All the recipes I can find online use way different hops, Ive never made my own recipe before so need some advice please?

Happy to base it on a Kit, I've done cold steep grain & grain boils & hop teas but don't want to go near BIAB or all grain.

Not looking for a technical marvel etc so long as its Red &| has those hop flavours Ill be a happy chap!

2 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 3:25 PM

Red red or amber?



All grain?

When I go amber/ red..
Pale, Munich, Caraaroma and some kind of roast for the colour.

3 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 3:58 PM

When ive had it on tap its far redder than that looks!!

Don't do All grain or BIAB sorry.

Havnt got the faintest idea where to start with grain amounts / steeping times etc.

4 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 4:07 PM

Sorry, can't help with extract.

Although http://store.coopers.com.au/ambre-amour-french-saison-rotm-pack.html bit strong but good base I'd suggest.

5 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 5:34 PM

You mean the innkeepers daughter & swap out the Dark crystal for a Caraaroma & then sub the goldings for the nelson & pacifica & maybe some Cascade?

Most Red IPA's Ive read use S-05.

TBH its normally only me that drinks my beers so as long as its not foul Im not that bothered if it doesn't turn out to be what I had wanted!

Other prob is its really hard to get TC kits other than the bog standard ones here in NZ, at least for close to a good price that is.

6 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 5:44 PM

Ahh, okay.
I would have thought just dropping the LDM and changing the hops would have worked. I wasn't suggesting the saison yeast, more the base ingredients.

7 Posted: Monday, October 09, 2017 7:50 PM

Hi Mikes15.

Given the info from the website & your personal info, perhaps give the following a try…

Coopers Light Liquid Malt extract 1.5kg
Coopers Light Dry Malt extract 1kg
Gladfield Redback Malt grain 250-300gms steeped.
Dextrose or table sugar 50gms
Fuggles (4.5%AA) 40gms @ 60mins
Cascade (8.3%AA) 15gms @ 30mins
Nelson Sauvin (12.6%AA) 15gms @ 10mins
Cascade 15gms @ 10mins
Pacifica 25gms hop tea
Nelson Sauvin 25gms hop tea
Dry hop (optional)
US-05 yeast
Brewed to 21 litres
Ferment @ 18-20°C
OG = approx. 1.045
FG = approx. 1.011 (given 75% attenuation)
EBC = approx. 12.9
IBU = 46.6
Bottled ABV = approx. 4.8%

No IBU, EBC, or yeast used is mentioned on the website, so I've guessed on a few areas. It is how I would first approach brewing this beer though.

Cheers & good luck with what ever you end up putting down.

Lusty.

8 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 2:20 PM

“Deep, gorgeous red” sounds a bit darker than 12.9 EBC, that's pretty much pale golden. My pale ales are darker than that

Lusty's recipe is a good one but I'd probably be inclined to swap out the Redback malt for Caraaroma, and perhaps a pinch of black patent. This is a photo of my regularly brewed red ale; it's not an IPA style but is the color more like the Harringtons one?



Cheers

Kelsey

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9 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 4:37 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

Lusty's recipe is a good one but I'd probably be inclined to swap out the Redback malt for Caraaroma, and perhaps a pinch of black patent. This is a photo of my regularly brewed red ale; it's not an IPA style but is the color more like the Harringtons one?

The reason for suggesting the Redback malt is that Mike stated Harrington's use exclusively Gladfield malts. The malt in Gladfield's range that is suggested to throw the red hue is the “Redback”malt. If not aligning with the Gladfield malts I would agree with you on the choice of CaraAroma.
Otto Von Blotto:

“Deep, gorgeous red” sounds a bit darker than 12.9 EBC, that's pretty much pale golden. My pale ales are darker than that

Hues can be thrown at various colour spectrums so the 12.9 albeit on the lower side is still able to throw a coloured hue.

Given the picture Ben supplied of the beer, it doesn't look particularly dark at all despite the “deep gorgeous” claim, so I based my EBC level on what I saw from Ben's pic. The beer is also listed as a “Session Red” so sometimes when creating a deeper colour you can create higher levels of sweetness that make the beer less session-able (IMHO).

I do agree with your suggestion of a small amount of black malt if you wished to darken the reddish hue.

Cheers,

Lusty.

10 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 5:27 PM

Beerlust:

Hi Mikes15.

Given the info from the website & your personal info, perhaps give the following a try…

Coopers Light Liquid Malt extract 1.5kg
Coopers Light Dry Malt extract 1kg
Gladfield Redback Malt grain 250-300gms steeped.
Dextrose or table sugar 50gms
Fuggles (4.5%AA) 40gms @ 60mins
Cascade (8.3%AA) 15gms @ 30mins
Nelson Sauvin (12.6%AA) 15gms @ 10mins
Cascade 15gms @ 10mins
Pacifica 25gms hop tea
Nelson Sauvin 25gms hop tea
Dry hop (optional)
US-05 yeast
Brewed to 21 litres
Ferment @ 18-20°C
OG = approx. 1.045
FG = approx. 1.011 (given 75% attenuation)
EBC = approx. 12.9
IBU = 46.6
Bottled ABV = approx. 4.8%

No IBU, EBC, or yeast used is mentioned on the website, so I've guessed on a few areas. It is how I would first approach brewing this beer though.

Cheers & good luck with what ever you end up putting down.

Lusty.


Thanks so much for the post, Im up for giving it a go,

When you say “a little black malt” what are we talking, 250 of the redback & 50 of the black?

11 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 5:51 PM

Mikes15:

When you say “a little black malt” what are we talking, 250 of the redback & 50 of the black?

We are talking about an undetermined colour/hue so it is really up to your own design about how deep & dark that reddish hue is aimed at.

Your numbers sound good though. Maybe back the Redback off to 150-200gms if you plan to include 50gms of a roasted malt.

Cheers & good luck with the brew,

Lusty.

12 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 6:21 PM

This is an AG version using RedX (and some other grains).

I find Red X gives a great reddish hue so maybe try steep that.


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13 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:46 PM

Nice glass mattyh77. I have the same, but I would be very nervous balancing it on that upright post on your deck!

14 Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:32 PM

Beerlust:

The reason for suggesting the Redback malt is that Mike stated Harrington's use exclusively Gladfield malts. The malt in Gladfield's range that is suggested to throw the red hue is the “Redback”malt. If not aligning with the Gladfield malts I would agree with you on the choice of CaraAroma.

He guessed that's what they used actually. They may well use other grains entirely. Given they don't actually say anywhere what grains are used, there is no guarantee that it's all Gladfield grains.

Beerlust:

Given the picture Ben supplied of the beer, it doesn't look particularly dark at all despite the “deep gorgeous” claim, so I based my EBC level on what I saw from Ben's pic. The beer is also listed as a “Session Red” so sometimes when creating a deeper colour you can create higher levels of sweetness that make the beer less session-able (IMHO).

The beer in my post is technically a session red since it comes out around 4-4.3%ABV most batches. It also uses a fair whack of Caraaroma and English yeast at your own suggestion . It's well balanced though. I would agree that the beer in Ben's pic doesn't look all that dark or all that red for that matter, although Mike suggested the ones he's had on tap have been darker/redder than that one. Maybe the picture doesn't do it justice

FYI Mike, BIAB is all grain. It's just a 1 vessel method of doing it, as opposed to the traditional 3 vessel set ups.

Cheers

Kelsey

15 Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:37 PM

Cant thank you all enough for the feedback guys,

Can I pls ask,

- Cold steep overnight, 2ltrs, strain, boil, cool, pitch?

- Boil 5ltrs water with 500g LDM? into which goes Fuggles (4.5%AA) 40gms @ 60mins, Cascade (8.3%AA) 15gms @ 30mins, Nelson Sauvin (12.6%AA) 15gms @ 10mins, Cascade 15gms @ 10mins

- hop tea, Pacifica 25gms, Nelson Sauvin 25gms, do you mean add at FO or what exactly does “Hop tea” mean in terms of the process, I thought boiling water / Malt / hops was a hop tea?

Will pick up a bottle of this asap to check the colour & hop style to see if I want to dry hop or not, thinking a light 10-15g nudge of both Pacifica & nelson might be nice but might not mimic the “hop-back” brewing style.

Ps- Yes Im guessing they use Gladfields, sure a tv show recently on Gladfields mentions Harrington's, the farm / maltery(?) an harringtons are both in Canterbury & any way I live in south Canterbury so will be a nice touch.

16 Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 7:04 AM

There's probably not much need for cold steeping but if you do it, that is the method. You use the wort from that steeping in the boil as well, 5 or 6 litres of water with 500g LDM should do the trick.

Hop tea basically means just steeping them in water just off the boil for 20 minutes or so. I don't see why they can't be added at flameout though.

17 Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 12:10 AM

So my suppliers doesn't have black patent,

Any suggestions or indication on what to use instead? ; -

This is there stock of Grains

18 Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 1 PM

HBS have said the only Gladfields grain they could suggest would be Roasted barley but they warn it may cause astringency so think Ill go with plan b which is Carafa T3.

Looking like this is a $60nzd brew, still cheaper than what Im hoping to recreate!

19 Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 2:17 PM

Mikes15:

HBS have said the only Gladfields grain they could suggest would be Roasted barley but they warn it may cause astringency so think Ill go with plan b which is Carafa T3.

If you cold steep the roasted barley overnight it's said to carryover less astringency. If you do plan to use the Carafa instead of the roasted barley, then make sure it is the “Carafa Special”. The ‘special’ tag refers to this malt being de-husked. The husks are stated as being much of the cause of astringency with roasted/darker malts especially when boiling/hot steeping. Your choice really.
Otto Von Blotto:

Hop tea basically means just steeping them in water just off the boil for 20 minutes or so. I don't see why they can't be added at flameout though.

You attain better utilisation of hops in pure water. You lose no wort to hop absorption when using a hop tea. Adding hops at flameout will garner an undetermined amount of bitterness until the wort cools below 80°C. Making a controlled sub 80°C hop tea takes the undetermined added bitterness out of play.

With full volume brewers it's less of an issue, but for extract/partial brewers what you lose in wort, is then often replaced by your top up water, thus diluting the brew unnecessarily.

Cheers,

Lusty.

20 Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 2:19 PM

Bairds black is black patent malt mate.