1 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:07 PM

G'day fellas!

Just got my first brew out of its two weeks bottling to find it seemed somewhat under-carbonated and slightly Vegemite flavoured.

I assume the vegemite flavour can be attributed to high concentrations of brewers yeast which would indicate it probably needs longer.

I'm in Brisbane and it's been pretty comfortably above 18 more or less the whole time so I don't think temp has been an issue.

So I was thinking of giving them all a gentle shake and giving them another week over 18 degrees? Of course, i don't really know what's right so that's why I'm asking you guys.

Any questions, ask.

Thanks in advance :)

2 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:34 PM

what was the brew??

and fermenting at 18 is good temps. you dont want it too much higher..

but bottle conditioning should be done around 25 degrees for 2 weeks.

3 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:46 PM

It was the one that comes with the kit.

1kg Brew Enhancer 1 1.7kg
Original Series Lager Brewing Extract

It was on the top shelf of a cupboard covered ina duna. The room was mostly at 22 degrees. I assume in there it would be colder. According to the instructions it was advised AT LEAST 18 so i thought this would suit.

4 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:48 PM

Del:

what was the brew??

and fermenting at 18 is good temps. you dont want it too much higher..

but bottle conditioning should be done around 25 degrees for 2 weeks.


That's not what the instructions say. 22-28 degrees (from memory) for fermenting in the FV and 18 for bottling for two weeks.

5 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:57 PM

blackout182:

Del:

what was the brew??

and fermenting at 18 is good temps. you dont want it too much higher..

but bottle conditioning should be done around 25 degrees for 2 weeks.


That's not what the instructions say. 22-28 degrees (from memory) for fermenting in the FV and 18 for bottling for two weeks.



yes… thats been spoken of a lot in here.. ;)

most will tell you ferment at 18

and condition warmer.

i try to ferment at 18 and condition at 25

6 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:41 PM

Hi blackout182.

Yeast will carbonate beer or ferment wort comfortably within their advised fermentation range. The Coopers Original Lager kit comes with an ale yeast strain & should comfortably carbonate the beer at temperatures of 18°C & above. True lager strains can ferment sugars or carbonate beer at reasonably low temperatures.

As far as the vegemite flavours (sometimes referred to as burnt rubber) you claim to be experiencing, these are usually caused by beer sitting on the yeast cake for unsuitably longish periods where the beer eventually becomes exposed to "yeast autolysis". Yeast autolysis is simply where the yeast cells rupture & release all sorts of nasty off flavours.

How long did your beer sit in the fermenter before you bottled it?

Cheers,

Lusty.

7 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 6:33 PM

Beerlust:

Hi blackout182.

How long did your beer sit in the fermenter before you bottled it?

Cheers,

Lusty.


Hey mate, thanks for the reply.

It was in their 7 days. Tested gravity day six then again day 7 and they were the same. Bottled straight after.

8 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:49 PM

I suspect the flavour you are experiencing is just a yeasty flavour from the beer still being very young. Give it some more time and the flavour will likely improve.

Personally I wait two weeks, and sometimes even three (if I am busy) before bottling, and then wait three weeks after bottling before drinking. Beer will carbonate very quickly if stored at 25C, and more slowly if carbed at 18C. Personally I carbonate at ambient temps, as long as they are above 18C. In the winter here in Canada house temps might get down to 16C at night, so then I take steps to keep it above 18C (I tend to use ale yeast).

Once your beer is carbonated, you should store it as cool as you can, to slow the staling process. I know you fellas in the Southern Hemisphere are heading into summer. Beer will stale twice as fast at 30C as it will at 20C, and half as fast at 10C.

Cheers,

Christina.

9 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:35 AM

Thanks Christina,

I think I'll leave it another week and just sample it every week or so.

:)

10 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:57 AM

Hey blackout182,
Just curious in how you primed your bottles? Carb drops? Dextrose? Sugar? And at what rate? What size bottles do you have? Just trying to find out why they are not carbonated yet

11 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:24 AM

My beers are almost always fully carb'd after one week… or at least the PET bottles are feeling quite firm by then, even at slightly lower temps than you indicate. And, on the odd occasion where I've opened one up early they've always been well-carbed, AND I also use less priming than two carb drops provide, which is what I'm assuming you used?

If they're not carb'd after 2 weeks at 18ºC then I reckon something dodgy is going on. As for the yeast off-flavour… hard to explain that!

Anyway, as others have suggested, perhaps time will heal….

12 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:12 AM

Rowbrew:

Hey blackout182,
Just curious in how you primed your bottles? Carb drops? Dextrose? Sugar? And at what rate? What size bottles do you have? Just trying to find out why they are not carbonated yet



I used all the generic stuff. Carbonation drops, the sugar it came with. I used the PET bottles it came with.

BlackSands, i should clarify they are firm and carbonated, i just feel like they should have been fizzier. Might have just been being pedantic.

13 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:20 AM

Time should help with both.

You will find that beer is carbonated after a week or two but after another couple of weeks it will be more consistent and with a longer lasting head etc.

Have patience. No need to shake them, just leave them be and keep trying them until they are good to go.

14 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:04 PM

blackout182:

It was on the top shelf of a cupboard covered ina duna. The room was mostly at 22 degrees. I assume in there it would be colder. According to the instructions it was advised AT LEAST 18 so i thought this would suit.

If it was sitting in a cupboard in a room that was about 22C covered in a doona then the brew was probably sitting at more like 25 or 26C. Fermentation creates heat, so the idea is to keep the ambient a couple of degrees colder than the intended fermentation temperature, at least for the first few days, or better still control the temp of the brew itself rather than the air around it.

Don't take much notice of the temps in the instructions either. They're pretty much the idiot proof temps, but they don't produce as nice a beer. Ale yeast is best fermented at around 18-20 degrees in most cases (there are some exceptions to this), for clean results.

15 Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:09 PM

How long are you leaving in fridge. The co2 wont dissolve into warm beer as well as itwill cold beer. So a couple of days in fridge once the bottle conditioning is finished helps the beer absorb the co2

Last edited by Bolchy (Friday, September 15, 2017 2:09 PM)