1 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 6:10 AM

Just thought I would share this link about harsh malts, that is malts that are between 70L-200L. This includes crystal malts between 70-120L, Special B, Brown malt, and Pale Chocolate malts. The advice from Randy Mosher, author of “Mastering Homebrewing,” is that they should be used carefully, as they can add harsh tones to a beer.

http://beersmith.com/blog/2017/08/31/harsh-zone-crystal-and-colored-malts-in-beer-brewing/

Think I might pay more attention to this. For a lot of my recipes 2% = ~75gm; 5% = ~175gm, and 10% = ~350gm.

Cheers,

Christina.

2 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 6:21 AM

Interesting that the pale chocolate malt can be harsher than the regular one! I haven't had any problems from using these grains in my recipes, but looking at the three recipes that use them in decent amounts, they pretty much all fall within the guidelines suggested in the article. The exception is the stout which contains 7% roasted barley and 15% overall of these darker roasted grains, though I note roasted barley isn't listed there so it's more like 8% “harsh malts” I guess, and the red ale which uses 6.5% Caraaroma (similar to Special B), neither of which taste bad at all. I see no need to use any higher percentage in these recipes though.

I have some brown malt as well which I plan to use in a porter soon, as I have yet to brew one using it and have read plenty of good reports on it.

Cheers

Kelsey

3 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 7:44 AM

Interesting. I use both Caraaroma and Special B in my ESB grist (yeah I know it isn't to style) and it isn't harsh at all. I think combined it makes up under 10% of the grain bill and it actually has a smooth finish.

The article doesn't discuss cold steeping those malts to reduce the harshness.

4 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:39 AM

Hairy:

Interesting. I use both Caraaroma and Special B in my ESB grist (yeah I know it isn't to style) and it isn't harsh at all. I think combined it makes up under 10% of the grain bill and it actually has a smooth finish.

The article doesn't discuss cold steeping those malts to reduce the harshness.


Hi Harry,

No, it doesn't. Is that what you do?

I have only seen cold steeping recommended for black patent, though many (including me) use it for roasted barley and regular chocolate as well.

Cheers,

Christina.

5 Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:41 AM

Otto Von Blotto:

Interesting that the pale chocolate malt can be harsher than the regular one! I haven't had any problems from using these grains in my recipes, but looking at the three recipes that use them in decent amounts, they pretty much all fall within the guidelines suggested in the article. The exception is the stout which contains 7% roasted barley and 15% overall of these darker roasted grains, though I note roasted barley isn't listed there so it's more like 8% “harsh malts” I guess, and the red ale which uses 6.5% Caraaroma (similar to Special B), neither of which taste bad at all. I see no need to use any higher percentage in these recipes though.

I have some brown malt as well which I plan to use in a porter soon, as I have yet to brew one using it and have read plenty of good reports on it.

Cheers

Kelsey


Hi Kelsey,

Yeah, roasted barley is way darker than 200L; it is not in the harsh zone.

Cheers,

Christina.

6 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:16 PM

I was going to go but I use heaps more caraaroma blah….

nope. 3% to 5% in my big red.



Kelsey brown malt is yummy in a porter.


Thanks Christina for the link, some good reading there.
Looking back I have made a porter with 7.6% brown and 5.5% caraaroma. It was very nice but as stated in the article - to style in a robust porter.

7 Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:11 PM

ChristinaS1:

Hairy:

Interesting. I use both Caraaroma and Special B in my ESB grist (yeah I know it isn't to style) and it isn't harsh at all. I think combined it makes up under 10% of the grain bill and it actually has a smooth finish.

The article doesn't discuss cold steeping those malts to reduce the harshness.


Hi Harry,

No, it doesn't. Is that what you do?

I have only seen cold steeping recommended for black patent, though many (including me) use it for roasted barley and regular chocolate as well.

Cheers,

Christina.

When you turn to the subject of Harry
That's a horse of a different safari
He can box like fox, he's as dumb as an ox
But it's Harry I'm planning to marry

Sorry, my childhood of being subjected to musicals just came flooding back.

I have never cold steeped dark malts, too much extra work for me

I do make water adjustments though for dark beers and add some calcium carbonate (chalk).

Last edited by Hairy (Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:11 PM)