1 Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 5:06 PM

I'm curious, because I have a terrible habit of failing to log data.

I'm not sure what the longest I've seen is, maybe 24 hours?

Cheers

JP

2 Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 5:15 PM

36… the beer was infected.

Quickest… 3 hours. Yeast cake.

3 Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 5:24 PM

That's interesting, since the yeast is basically resting at that point.

I've pitched active wort into batches and seen activity within a few hours, which makes sense because it's already working.

4 Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 7:09 PM

Ben 10:

36… the beer was infected.

Quickest… 3 hours. Yeast cake.


Slowest one I had recently also took around 36 hours. It ended up seriously phenolic only days into the fermentation. Tipped it. Long lag times make me very anxious!

Ordinarily I pitch slurry - there's nothing more reassuring than a healthy krausen in a matter of just a few hours! And I've certainly never had a bad brew from pitching a fresh slurry.

Coopers kit yeast and Nottingham rehydrated, two yeasts I've used very recently, were both reasonably quick and usually well under way in 12hrs or so. US-05 in contrast, a yeast which I no longer use, seems to take around a day to get going.

5 Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 9:35 PM

I've had batches go all ninja and turn out fine , few attempts at Lagers throw very little and turn out fine .
Normal visible start with my pitching rates is 12-18 hours for ales and 3-5 days to FG depending on strain
RDWAHAHB , stop checking every 15 mins and let the yeasties do what they're good at

6 Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 7:23 AM

Thanks Mark, I'll check every 12 minutes instead of every 15 from now on

I've got a healthy looking krausen after 24 hours, but airlock activity was next to nothing.

I've addressed this in another post concerning Bunnings FV's

Cheers

JP

7 Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:34 PM

48 hours. Good old BRY-97. Got me feeling quite anxious. It then got stuck but may have been that I underpitched. The same beer is now in the final stages of cold crashing. Hoping for the best.
Cheers,
Mike

8 Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 1:19 PM

About 50 hours with 2001 Urquell yeast was the longest I've waited to see visible signs of activity after pitching the yeast. By visible signs I don't mean a full krausen, I just mean starting to see a layer of bubbles forming on the surface of the beer.

Most batches I fermented with that yeast showed a lag time of at least 40 hours, and none was ever infected. More recently I've switched to 2000 Budvar lager yeast and the first two batches with that had a lag time around 36-40 hours, however the most recent one which is currently in the FV was only about 24-26 hours.

Cheers

Kelsey

9 Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 1:21 PM

I reckon … 60 hours. I was getting worried after 48 but the next morning it had started. I think I might have even posted a thread here about it? It was waaaaaaaaaaaaay back in the day

EDIT - I was right! Here's my thread about the 60 hour lag

10 Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:50 AM

Sheesh.

I've been fortunate, I'd get too anxious waiting that long for something to happen.

I'm sure I'd feel differently had I not ended up with two infected batches last year.


I got to see a a bit more with my latest batch, pitched yesterday around 11am, thin layer of bubbles on the surface around 10 hours later, high krausen early this morning.

I'm going to do some reading on the fermentation stages because I'm curious how long high krausen generally lasts for my typical brews.

Obviously high krausen is just a term, and also somewhat of a misnomer, since it's possible to have a big foamy head before the yeast even takes off, and can stay there long after the yeast are done, I'm interested in the period of peak activity.

Cheers

JP

11 Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 2:02 PM

I'm used to it with lager yeasts so it doesn't really bother me waiting that long with them. If it was an ale yeast I still probably wouldn't be anxious but would be wondering WTF was taking it so long .

I used to get lag times with ale yeasts of around 10-12 hours, but since I began adding oxygen to the wort this lag time has increased to around 20 hours. It's not a problem, it's just the yeast scavenging the extra O2.

12 Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 3:41 PM

That's interesting.

I would have thought it would speed things up.

13 Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 6:09 AM

It has led to healthier ferments, but they use up all the oxygen before they begin doing anything else as I understand it, so if there is more oxygen there then it will take them longer to get going.

14 Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 8:15 AM

Otto Von Blotto:

It has led to healthier ferments…

Just out of curiosity, how do determine the health of a fermentation?

15 Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 10:34 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

About 50 hours with 2001 Urquell yeast was the longest I've waited to see visible signs of activity after pitching the yeast. By visible signs I don't mean a full krausen, I just mean starting to see a layer of bubbles forming on the surface of the beer.

Most batches I fermented with that yeast showed a lag time of at least 40 hours, and none was ever infected. More recently I've switched to 2000 Budvar lager yeast and the first two batches with that had a lag time around 36-40 hours, however the most recent one which is currently in the FV was only about 24-26 hours.

Cheers

Kelsey


Went searching because I remember Kelsey saying his lager yeasts take a while to get going when pitching at the fermentation temps (rather than pitching at 18 or 20C and bringing the temp down).

When I woke up this morning at 6am I checked my brew fridge and my IPL with S-23 slurry had finally built a krausen. 44 hours after pitching.

I'll be pitching a Sam Adams Boston Lager next with W34/70 slurry at 10C as well and fully expect a 40hr lag time between pitch and krausen

16 Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 9:58 AM

BlackSands:

Otto Von Blotto:

It has led to healthier ferments…

Just out of curiosity, how do determine the health of a fermentation?

Only just saw this post. I generally go by the speed at which it takes place, a minor consideration is the size of the krausen. My ales usually hit FG 4-5 days after pitching; I know others get shorter ferments at times and I have as well, but there's the other end of the scale where it's taking over two weeks to reach FG. That's not a healthy fermentation in my mind. A standard ale should be at FG in under 7 days really, exception can probably be made for really high OG brews.

17 Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 11:07 AM

First time ever having a brew that took longer than 24 hours to see krausen forming - about 30 hours.
When I used to dry pitch it was always around the 24 hour mark.
But since making starters and harvesting I usually see the krausen starting in well under 12 hours.
The only difference this time was the yeast was harvested and made into a starter ready for a brew 4 weeks ago.
I didn't end up brewing before heading back to work so the yeast was kept in the fridge.
On brew night I just poured the beer off and kept about 200mls shook it up a bit then pitched straight into the wort (~250-270 Bn cells).
It was pitched cold from the fridge into the wort.
I think next time I will either make a mini starter or let it warm up a bit.
My normal schedule it is to make the starters 3-4 days in advance of brew night.
Was getting stressed the yeast had failed, hope I don't get an infection.
It is harvested West Yorkshire Ale 1469 by the way.
Will take a sample in 3-4 days, should be able to tell then if it's infected?

Cheers

James

18 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:57 AM

Took a sample yesterday about a day and a half after full krausen formation and it was 1.030 down from 1.055.
Sample did not smell or taste off or sour, so touch wood, this one hasn't got infected…
Still 30 hours wait to see fermentation start is too long for me and my stress levels!

Cheers

James

19 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:09 PM

They actually take off faster when pitched cold in my experience although I've never left a starter in the fridge for weeks before pitching it. The harvested jars stay in there for weeks or months though, and get pitched into the starters cold and take off in a matter of hours. Granted, it's a much smaller wort and a much higher pitching rate compared to a proper batch.

If it's not tasting infected or anything at this point then I would think you'll be fine. 30 hours isn't a hell of a long time really, and just because the krausen hasn't formed yet doesn't mean fermentation hasn't started.

Cheers

Kelsey

Last edited by Otto Von Blotto (Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:09 PM)