1 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 1:05 PM

Just wondering if anyone's ever tried one. Of all the base malts I'm familiar with, munich is by far the strongest and maltiest, so I wonder if it would really be suited?

I had a “Zeitgeist” dark lager by Brew Dog recently you see and that uses munich as a base which got me thinking. I like to do simple experiments with smashes, for example, to learn what different ingredients really taste like by themselves.

2 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 1:32 PM

Yep, I have made a SMASH with Munich I and Centennial. It was very, very, very malty.

It wasn't a bad beer but not one of my favourite SMASH beers. I drank the batch so it must have been drinkable.

Give it a go.

3 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 1:57 PM

Don't do it KR. Well, I guess it's always possible that you might like Munich malt more than me, but I couldn't drink a 100% Munich malt beer (based on the smaller percentages I have brewed with).

4 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 2:05 PM

Do it KR. Just because John told you not to

5 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 8 PM

I love Munich. Regularly use 1kg in a 23 litre brew.

6 Posted: Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:28 PM

So, 25-30%?

7 Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 6:35 AM

I had one that was 50% and don't recall it being bad.

8 Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:06 AM

You can't make a SMASH with less than 100%

9 Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:19 AM

Can anyone shine any light on the difference between munichI and munichII apart from the II being darker. Is there any difference flavour wise?

10 Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:41 AM

I haven't used a lot of Munich II and when I have it was in smaller quantities. It is definitely darker, maltier and more rich but I haven't done a side by side comparison in a beer.

One thing to note though is that Munich II has much less diastatic power and may not be able to self-convert if used as the sole base malt.

11 Posted: Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:52 AM

I haven't used munich I yet but have used a 1kg or 18% of munich II and it produced nice beer. I will give munich I a go and see what I think.

12 Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 3:40 PM

Just thinking aloud … maybe mashing high and aiming for a sessionable 4% ABV would be the way to go with munich …

13 Posted: Monday, August 14, 2017 6:32 PM

This maltier direction is heading into very malty territory, almost Belgian-like.

Good luck with the brew Ruddy.

Lusty.

14 Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 10:50 PM

Lusty, I doubt anything with plenty of Munich malt and mashed at a high temperature would produce anything Belgian-esque. Without using a good percentage of simple sugar anyway, which would seem to counteract the point of mashing high. While I agree that Belgian beers tend to have beautiful malt character, they are usually very well attenuated and finish dry.

15 Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 11:15 PM

porschemad911:

Lusty, I doubt anything with plenty of Munich malt and mashed at a high temperature would produce anything Belgian-esque. Without using a good percentage of simple sugar anyway, which would seem to counteract the point of mashing high. While I agree that Belgian beers tend to have beautiful malt character, they are usually very well attenuated and finish dry.

Without being ultra-serious, my comment was a light hearted way of suggesting Ruddy's beer will present more maltier than perhaps he perceives it might. Nothing more than that.

On a more serious side of my “Belgian-like” comment, a very prominent malt used in the more maltier Belgian brews is Aromatic malt. I have used this many times at varying weights with my brewing, so understand it very well I feel. Munich malt has a heightened maltiness above most base malts but attenuates well with that. A pure Munich malt grist would make for a very malty beer is all I was trying to say.

In a Belgian style, if that isn't enough maltiness for you, then try Aromatic malt.

Cheers,

Lusty.

16 Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 10:24 PM

Hmmm, from reading ‘Brew Like a Monk’ I always thought the Belgian brewers had very simple recipes, with a minimum of specialty malts. Mostly pilsner malt with additional colour and flavour coming from a variety of candi sugars and syrups. Although my favourite Orval does use a couple of unspecified specialty malts in small quantities … perhaps Aromatic is one of them.

17 Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 8:41 PM

Munich 1 smash is great with low to moderate bitterness

Ide recommend munich/magnum smash with single bittering of magnum around 25 IBUs
Let the malt shine with the hops aside on this one

Vienna is better for a smash with tad more later hops such as floral noble hop- mt hood is my faverate

18 Posted: Thursday, February 08, 2018 2:05 PM

Starting to consider this again. I think perhaps a small batch is in order!

19 Posted: Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:33 PM

Munich SMASH would be way too malty for my palate. I brewed a Dortmunder Export with a can of Briess Munich (which i think is only 50% Munich malt) and it was way off the malt scale for me. I still have that batch and am giving a lot away and drinking the rest very slowly.

I reckon go Vienna smash if you want a malty one that is still drinkable and enjoyable.

20 Posted: Friday, February 09, 2018 5:37 AM

Been there, done that