1 Posted: Sunday, June 18, 2017 12:47 PM

Hi All,

Have been given a pack of Coopers light dry malt to use and have ordered a can of English bitter to use with it. The malt is only 500g so I'm wondering if this is ok for the English bitter or if I need to add more fermentables to this brew when I start it?? Only on my third brew now so am still feeling my way.

2 Posted: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:13 PM

Hi Cawarralite Brewer, & welcome to the forum.

Using 500gms of light dry malt extract in conjunction with the English bitter kit will give a beer around 3.5% ABV bottled if brewed to 23 litres. You can certainly add another 500gms of malt extract or other fermentables to increase the ABV further if you wish. Adding another 500gms of dry malt extract will bring the final bottled ABV up to around 4.3% if brewed to the same volume, & provide a fuller flavoured beer in the process.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

3 Posted: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:22 PM

Thankyou Lusty Sir,

That is what I thought would be the case but didn't want to go ahead with the plan and waste a brew. Will have a think about that and make a descision by the time i have to put it down to brew.

Cheers.
C.B.

4 Posted: Sunday, June 18, 2017 6:18 PM

Thats my go to kit beer and i use 1kg ldm.

5 Posted: Sunday, June 18, 2017 6:58 PM

Titan8:

Thats my go to kit beer and i use 1kg ldm.


Yeah mine too. My mates like this one.
Although this time I've gone for the Hop Gobbler.

http://store.coopers.com.au/recipes/index/view/id/37/

Obviously didn't read the instructions properly and only brewed it to 23 litres though.

6 Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 7:24 AM

Thanks for the input everyone. It's good to know what other people do. The local shop doesn't have any more ldm so am going to either try this one as a 3.5 like Lusty suggested or bulk it up with some sugar….. either way it should be alright.

Cheers all.
C.B.

7 Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 8:40 AM

Cawarralite Brewer:

Thanks for the input everyone. It's good to know what other people do. The local shop doesn't have any more ldm so am going to either try this one as a 3.5 like Lusty suggested or bulk it up with some sugar….. either way it should be alright.

Cheers all.
C.B.

Can you not get hold of some liquid extract? I used to use it exclusively as it was always so much cheaper than the dry stuff.

8 Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 10:53 AM

Haven't seen any liquid extract in the shops here. Have checked in the three main supermarkets that are in town. Will have to check the brew shop one day soon and see what they have. Might just have to order my supplies directly from the Coopers Store.

9 Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 6:45 PM

Cawarralite Brewer:

………. or bulk it up with some sugar…..Cheers all.
C.B.


Don't do it

Hey Cawarralite
Welcome to the forum.
Why not do the brew with 500g of LDM and only top up to 20 litres. Remember you are brewing an English Bitter:

Ordinary Bitter 3.2 - 3.8% ABV
Best Bitter 3.8 - 4.6% ABV
Extra Special Bitter 4.6% - 6.2%

FWIW I reckon the Coopers EB can makes a great mid strength, so I wouldn't stress out too much.

Cheers & Beers
Scottie
Valley Brew

10 Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 11:42 PM

I'm with Scottie.

I'm a bit of a rebel and believe there are times when sugar is appropriate in a beer - this just isn't one of them.

I'm a bit of a ordinary/mild fan myself and the style really suits the Cooper's can.

11 Posted: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 12:11 PM

Alcohol level is only part of the story. I have never been a fan of the English Bitter kit, in spite of being a big fan of English Bitters. I think I recently figured out why. The style guidelines say Best Bitters should have IBUs 32.5-40; the kit comes with 45.8IBUs. Made to 23L with 1kg of DME the BU:GU ratio (IBU:Gravity) is 1.17, whereas a Best Bitter should be around ~0.70. It is way out of style, isn't it?

Scottie's suggestion of adding 500gm of DME and making to 20L, brings the BU:GU ratio 1.26.

When I want an English Bitter I use an OS Lager kit as the base.

Cheers,

Christina.

12 Posted: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 11:01 PM

Fair cop, but I wouldn't suggest a Best from the kit. The bitterness does drop a bit through the ferment, but I admit it's more of an Australian Bitter than an English. One reason why it fits better as an Ordinary or Mild.

13 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 6:33 AM

I've got to admit that I'm a bit of a dunce when it comes to the technicalities of brewing and I'm really limited to OG, FG, %ABV, IBU, and the BJCP guidelines. I'm also pretty much a novice when it comes to real English Bitters only sampling one or two from the Old Country and several Aussie Craft versions. I have brewed many English Bitters, well at least I thought they were English Bitters.

I find the last two posts odd, either that or PB2 (sorry Paul) and the crowd at Coopers have pulled a swifty on me and led me astray. Given how naïve I am living a sheltered life as I do I guess this was pretty easy. With all due respect Coopers have left me thinking I'm brewing an EB when in fact I'm not, on top of that I thought that Australian Bitters were Lagers.

Coopers Battleship Bitter:

This recipe is made in a similar style to Adnams Broadside - an Extra Special Bitter brew. Adnams beer dates back almost as far as Coopers, this particular brew commemorates “The battle of Sole Bay” and fits in the BJCP category, (English Pale Ale category 8.C.). The finished beer displays lifted floral and spice aromas layered with orange peel and apricot, mouth filling malt flavours finishing with firm bitterness.

Ingredients:
1 x 1.7kg English Bitter
3 x 500g Coopers Light Dry Malt
1 x 25g East Kent Golding (EKG) Hop Pellets
1 x 25g Centennial Hop Pellets
1 x Lallemand Nottingham Yeast Sachet
1 x 250g Coopers Carbonation Drops


Extra Smooth Bitter:

Coopers English Bitter was developed with Styrian Golding late hop aroma in line with the style from the “Mother Land”. The addition of Molasses produces a slight buttery character which smooths the perceived level of bitterness.

Ingredients
1.7kg English Bitter
1kg Coopers Brew Enhancer 1
200g Molasses
Coopers Carbonation Drops


One Confused Brewer
Scottie

14 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 8:16 AM

Speaking of English bitter… I notice ESB has been dropped as a BJCP style (Beersmith), either that or it's now simply renamed/re-defined as “strong bitter” (11C)

15 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 10:48 AM

Scottie, I too am confused. I have not paid much attention to the BU:GU ratio either, not until recently, but I have tended to avoid the Dark Ale, English Bitter, and Real Ale kits for a long time, because I found them too bitter. I just figured I was an IBU wuss, based on how many people on the forum rave about the English Bitter kit and love making toucans. I only noticed the BU:GU ratio of the English Bitter a couple of days ago, and now I feel validated. In any case, I mostly stick to the APA, OS Lager, Draught, and Mexican Cervesa kits.

I am not sure why Coopers does this. Maybe they are catering to the Aussie market Maybe I am placing too much importance on the ratio?

Another thing I don't understand: how the monthly recipes, like this month's Macho Macchiato Stout, often call for large amounts of roasted malts to be added to already roast heavy kits. The Irish Stout kit probably already has around 9% or more of roasted barley. Made according to the recipe, you'd be adding another 9% roasted (chocolate) malt, doubling it. 18% roasted malt is a lot in an ~4.5% beer, isn't it?

Cheers,

Christina.

16 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 11:22 AM

ChristinaS1:

In any case, I mostly stick to the APA, OS Lager, Draught, and Mexican Cervesa kits.

Aside from the kits you list, (with perhaps the addition of European Lager, Canadian Blonde?) I came to the conclusion that most of their kits don't really benefit from any further malt additions and in fact, as you observed with the current ROTM it's probably too much.

17 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 11:26 AM

In relation to the BU:GU ratio, I have done a couple of English bitter recipes over the years. My most recent one was guided by the “Special/Best/Premium” category, OG 1.048 and 36.7 IBUs, the BU:GU ratio being 0.768, much closer to the figure quoted by Christina, style guide arrows hanging more towards the top end of the range, but a very enjoyable beer. The other one was an OG of 1.044 and 33IBUs, and the ratio 0.763. All the arrows lined up smack bang in the middle of the style guide for that recipe and it turned out a cracking beer too, which reminded me a fair bit of some of the English ales I have sampled.

I think Christina might have a valid point, to be honest, although the couple of times I did brew the EB kit I didn't find it over bittered either. Maybe the quoted IBUs are wrong on it .

Cheers

Kelsey

18 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 12:09 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

My most recent one was guided by the “Special/Best/Premium” category…

As mentioned above this is no longer part of BJCP (2015) styles. Looks like what we once knew as ESB's now fall under the Best Bitter category (11B).

My last bitter's ratio was 0.7777

19 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 12:15 PM

It has been renamed but the guideline figures etc. are all the same as the previously named one I referred to. Same thing happened to Bohemian Pilsner, it's now called “Czech Premium Pale Lager” but all the characteristics/style guidelines remain the same as they were.

20 Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 2:14 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

It has been renamed but the guideline figures etc. are all the same as the previously named one I referred to. Same thing happened to Bohemian Pilsner, it's now called “Czech Premium Pale Lager” but all the characteristics/style guidelines remain the same as they were.


There must have been a merging somewhere though… Ordinary Bitter, Best Bitter, ESB/Strong Bitter, has become Ordinary Bitter, Best Bitter and Strong Bitter, where strong bitter is now beyond the specs for ESB. Perhaps…

Ordinary Bitter 2015 = Ordinary & Best Bitter 2008
Best Bitter 2015 = ESB 2008

?