1 Posted: Sunday, June 04, 2017 4:41 PM

If you've seen my latest tasting video you will have seen me get quite excited about Nail Brewing's gold ale. It was awesome, and I loved the hops which are Galaxy, as it turns out. How do I know that? It was written on the bottle!! Not only that though, the bottle provides all this other info as well:

- Pale and caramunich malts
- Galaxy hops
- 1.045 OG
- 30 IBUs
- 5% ABV

It was slightly lighter than my 12 EBC Smurto golden too, so that's another clue.

First question: what exactly is “pale” malt?

2 Posted: Sunday, June 04, 2017 5:23 PM

King Ruddager:

If you've seen my latest tasting video you will have seen me get quite excited about Nail Brewing's gold ale. It was awesome, and I loved the hops which are Galaxy, as it turns out. How do I know that? It was written on the bottle!! Not only that though, the bottle provides all this other info as well:

- Pale and caramunich malts
- Galaxy hops
- 1.045 OG
- 30 IBUs
- 5% ABV

It was slightly lighter than my 12 EBC Smurto golden too, so that's another clue.

First question: what exactly is “pale” malt?


Plenty of grains get called pale malt , i'll grab a bottle and see if i can pick what the base malt is
but have a sack of BB ale malt right next to me which would be a decent starting point
1.045 OG and 5% ABV means a FG of 1.007
That's 85% apparent attenuation so mash it low and long to get full conversion or do a stepped mash

3 Posted: Sunday, June 04, 2017 5:31 PM

Science!!

4 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 10:44 AM

Well I sent of an email to the brewer yesterday … no response yet

5 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 12:30 PM

I'm heading past a decent bottleshop today , will grab a bottle and see if can pick what's in it tonight

6 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 3:44 PM

Picked one up , very drinkable beer

Not a great deal of character from the base malt and only a little sweetness from the caramunich so malt wise it's not too hard
Noticed bottle says 100 % Australian so that narrows malts down further
I'm thinking Coopers yeast brewed cool would work very well or you could try re-activating yeast from Nail bottles
Off top of my head i'd be starting with something like
4.1 kg BB ale malt ( 95.3%)
200 g of caramunich (4.7%)
25 g of Galaxy @ 15 and @5 probably a small dry hop too
gives me
OG 1.045
FG 1.007 ( 5 % ABV kegged )
IBU 30.55
EBC 10.84

I'll give it a go and see how close it gets

7 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 7:38 PM

Haha! It seemed like you were a bit of a fan of this from your video… it might have been the sudden orgasm as soon as it touched your lips, I'm not sure. But your reaction made this the next thing for me to try!

8 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 7:43 PM

What's your batch size Mark?

9 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 9:12 PM

Sorry that's 24 litres @ 80 % brewhouse , i can brew you up a cube to take home or pick up from our store down south and ferment out if you're in a hurry as my fridge is full for next few weeks

10 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 10:53 PM

Let us know if you nail the clone!

I personally never try to actually clone someone else's beer - I get inspired and try to imitate the flavours/combinations I like, but my goal is usually to beat the beer that impresses me.

Sure, brewing my own saves money, but it's cooking, not science, and I always put my own touch on a recipe.

Pale malt usually refers to just that - a minimally roasted, usually 2 row barley, though there are some great 6 row versions. Apart from a purist pilsner, it is usually used as a base malt and the flavour profile built from the specialty malts and hop schedule.

Hope I don't offend anyone too much, but a clone of you being nailed tempts me to make a Jesus joke…

11 Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 11:39 PM

It's ok - I've got two other batches of golden to get through first and I'd like to do it myself anyway

But hang on, store down south? Home brew store?

12 Posted: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 6:21 AM

Not a home brew store , would like to work in one but work for a timber / hardware store and we have a branch at Lonsdale so can send things between stores easily .
I'll add this to my to brew list and let you know how it turns out

13 Posted: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 10:37 AM

Saw your video and am hoping to find this beer so I can give it a go!

Very keen to try and make it too… let us know how it goes

14 Posted: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:42 PM

Incidentally, 4-5% caramunich was the same number I came up with using colour as a reference point.

15 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 1:29 PM

Mark D Pirate:

….you could try re-activating yeast from Nail bottles.


You guys are always raving about Pirate Life beers. Wish I could try them.

Does Nail really bottle condition, like Coopers?

Cheers,

Christina.

16 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 1:32 PM

A number of the smaller craft brewers bottle condition in the same way as Coopers, Christina. It's not as uncommon as it used to be. I remember when I was in Sydney a few years back we got two extremes. One beer was flat as a tack and another one was highly over carbonated and poured into the glass like some of Blacksands' beers have in his jug

17 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 1:42 PM

ChristinaS1:

Mark D Pirate:

….you could try re-activating yeast from Nail bottles.


You guys are always raving about Pirate Life beers. Wish I could try them.

Does Nail really bottle condition, like Coopers?

You'd need to verify that the same yeast is being used to carbonate the beer as is being used to ferment the beer, else you may end up with an undesirable outcome. I would imagine that most of the craft breweries that naturally carbonate in the bottle wouldn't over complicate things, & would use the same strain through their processes.

Cheers,

Lusty.

18 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 9:22 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

A number of the smaller craft brewers bottle condition in the same way as Coopers, Christina. It's not as uncommon as it used to be. I remember when I was in Sydney a few years back we got two extremes. One beer was flat as a tack and another one was highly over carbonated and poured into the glass like some of Blacksands' beers have in his jug


In a thread about over-carbonation quite some time ago I remember PB2 mentioning that it took Coopers quite a while to figure out how to make carbonation consistent. I think they filter out the original yeast, reinvigorated it, and then add back a small, precisely measured amount. IIRC, it was something like a million cells/mL?

I've heard some breweries use something like Lallemand CBC-1 for bottle conditioning, at 1gm/L. CBC-1 is alcohol tolerant, does not ferment maltotriose, and has kill factors (sounds like it was derived from a wine yeast). The kill factors kill off the brewers yeast in a day or two, negating the need to filter or pasteurize the beer. The fact that it is incapable of making the enzymes that break down maltotriose prevents over carbonation during storage. Carbonation would be (more) consistent.

I don't think CBC-1 is available on a retail level. Home brewers can use Lallemand / Lalvin EC-1118 champagne yeast instead, which I have done once or twice. It has many the same properties as CBC-1 and is very cheap. Could be worth it if you intend to age your bottles.

Cheers,

Christina.

19 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 9:33 PM

I have no bottles to age anymore, but something like that does sound ideal for long term storage of bottles. I haven't bottled any beer at all this year, it's all gone into kegs. I prefer the flavor from force carbonation over natural carbonation too, so I'm not in any real hurry to bottle anything if I don't absolutely have to .

20 Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 10:38 PM

I haven't brewed any beers that are suitable for long-term storage (or I've been too thirsty to leave them alone!). However there is one brew that I have left alone in the bottle for almost 7 months. My brew notes say it was bottled on 17/11/2016.

I left it because it was a phenolic flavoured brew. Supposed to taste like a Little Creatures Pale Ale, but tastes more like medicine and cloves. Gross. So I just forgot about it under the house over summer and autumn.

I revisited this beer the other week and chilled down a couple of bottles. It is drinkable now, but that's being generous. Any hop flavour and aroma has faded and it still has a phenolic hint to it. Malt influence is there, but it's nothing like it was supposed to be.

Interestingly, these bottles are not over carbonated whatsoever. I was a bit concerned given how long they have been stored. But perhaps they are not gushers because I have listened to advice on this forum and waited until reaching FG before bottling - never in a rush. And I have primed at an appropriate rate. No infection either, so my sanitation must have been OK for this batch.

TBH I brew mostly hoppy pales which I find drink best after 3-4 weeks in the bottle and fade after 5 weeks. No need to age for what I like to brew and drink (at the moment anyway).

May well do a lager or two over winter, just to get some more experience in other styles.