1 Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 12:52 PM

Thanks to my 17 y/o, my brewed beer has taken a severe dent, hope he and his mates enjoyed it!
I'm on a blitzkrieg this month, trying to put five brews down in a very short time, with the help of a mate who has lent me a second vat.
The first brew, (although I have a All Inn Brewery “Maria Stout” in a vat, but refuses to reach FG) is the Coopers “Devil's Half Ruby Porter”. Have done this one before and remember it as a great brew.
My wife has asked me to use all the bottles of hops in the fridge whilst going on a brewing binge, so of to the mighty web to find hop combinations that fit in with porter.
Simply, not so, I'm afraid. So I went with bits and pieces of info and what's in the fridge.
1 x Half Ruby Can
1x Coopers Malt Extract “Dark”
500g of Dark Crystal Malt, in a muslin bag, brewed for 30 mins, in 1 litre of water, strained.
15 gms of Perle hops
10 gms of Halletau hops. Both teabagged and added after numerous straining though tea strainer.
Waiting for it to cool down before adding yeast.
I may make the batch up to 24/25 litres to compensates for the 500g of crystal and possible alcohol % increase.

What happens from here, not sure, but I'll keep this thread updated.

I have had numerous beers fail in recent times, and so have gone on a cleaning binge. The above loaned vat was given a massive clean, and for the first time I removed the large “O” ring in the lid. Well, surprise surprise, ( and not having a go at my mate, cause I've never removed the ring from my vat lid) there was miles crud under and around the ring.
Lets just say, that I think MY cleaning procedures could improve greatly.

Thanks for listening.

tj





2 Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:21 PM

Update.

Ok, let the wort cool, then added the yeast, supplied under the lid of the coopers can.
The Original gravity has come in at 1044.

On another note, the previously mentioned Maria Stout is, after 3+ weeks in the vat, has a gravity of 1014, anyone want to suggest when I should bottle it??

3 Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:36 PM

If you have had same reading for 2 or 3 days then its ready to bottle. 1.014 may be about right. I kegged a stout 2 weeks ago at 1.014 but in kegs i realy dont have and bomb problems. I did however bottle 1 long neck from this brew and so far no issue. As for the hop addition, i cant comment as never used those.

4 Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:47 PM

stouts porters and esbs have a lot of unfermentables so final gravitys will finish higher… also some English yeast will also finish higher too… so get prepared for bottle bombs if you don't get it spot on

5 Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 8:38 PM

I would have thought 1.014 was pretty much bang on FG for a stout, depending on what style of stout it is of course. The dry stouts like Guinness have a fairly low FG similar to Corona, but the bigger, more rich styles often finish there or a bit higher. I brewed a stout last year that finished at 1.016, and my porter that's next in line for a tap finished at 1.014. As Waylon points out, a bigger percentage of unfermentables in the malt makeup (dark grains), and if English yeast is used they often don't attenuate as much as American strains.

6 Posted: Thursday, May 25, 2017 8:16 AM

Thanks for the replies,
I was talking to a mate last night who had had the same issue, same beer.
He bottled at 1010, mostly because it had taken over a month to get there.
He lost none, and I had had drunk some without knowing the facts around the FG.
Tasted pretty good to me. I should be able to bottle this weekend.

The Porter that started this thread is happily bubbling away this morning, beer what a wonderful thing.

7 Posted: Thursday, May 25, 2017 10:30 AM

I suspect some new brewers get misled by hydrometers or other instructions that tell you not to bottle until the beer reaches a certain SG. My hydrometer has markings on it that indicate when the beer should be bottled but I don't think one batch I've done has ever got that low.

The reality is that different beers will finish fermenting at different SGs, it all depends on the malts used, mash temperature (and to a lesser extent mash duration), and the yeast strain used. Obviously with kits and extracts you don't know what temp the grains were mashed at to make the extract, and it's probably the same with FWKs. They will have an estimated FG but it may not get to exactly that number; the estimated FG on the Coopers recipes is given as a range e.g. 1.010-1.014 or something, because there are variables and not every batch of the same recipe will finish at the same SG.

8 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 1:22 PM

Update

The Porter that I started this thread with appears to have stalled, bubbled away for a day, then stopped cold. No sign of fermentation since.
I have not taken a reading, but would be very surprised if the process has finished.
Its sitting on a heat pad, cause winter has finally turned up,.
Any suggestions as to why it has stalled?
What can I do about it?

The stout, which made up part of this thread, has now been bottled, it was mentioned by me, that it too seemded to be going nowhere, as after nearly a month was sitting at 1014, I left it for another 4 days, on and off the heat pad, but got no other fermentation that I witnessed.
It went into the bottle at 1014, and when sugar was added, there was no sign of reaction, so presumable 1014 was finished.
I put marginally smaller amount of sugar into the prime.
Time will tell.

9 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 1:35 PM

Take a reading before you decide if it's stalled, visual indication and/or airlock bubbling (if that's the bubbling you refer to) aren't 100% reliable.

10 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 1:53 PM

I have to admit that I find SG=1.014 a little unnerving. My current brown ale has ‘stalled’ at 1.014. Estimated FG was 1.011. Pretty much all my brews finish at around 1.011 - 1.012 so when I get one that's a little on the high side like this one I'm never really sure if it's actually stalled or whether this is in fact quite a reasonable end point. Having had a few brews end up over-carb'd (though in those cases I suspect wild yeast infection) there's still a small uncertainty that once primed at the usual level and then bottled that they may end up over-carb'd so, with that in mind, priming on the low side is probably the safest option

11 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 2:02 PM

You would have hated a porter I brewed a few years ago that finished at 1.018 .

It must be remembered that different styles contain different malt makeups and so not every single batch you brew will finish around the same figure unless you constantly brew the same style all the time. I have a porter on tap that finished at 1.015 or thereabouts and it's fine. A stout last year finished at 1.016. Of course, the recipes were deliberately constructed to do this as I wanted a full body in them. The dark grains do tend to push the FG up as they don't really contain any fermentable sugars.

12 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 2:36 PM

My last porter started at 1.049 and US-05 pushed it to a FG of 1.014. The previous version started at 1.049 and only finished at 1.012 because I gave it an extra dose of Coopers yeast after it seemed to stall at 1.022.

13 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 5:31 PM

This is interesting, i did a stout a few weeks back, 2 weeks in fv the fermentasaurus. FG was around 1.014. Collected the trub in the harvesting bottle but it was full with no beer on the top. I think yeast layer was still in fv. Some yeast was obviously in the collector and it was not a pressure ferment. Stored in the fridge directly after collection. Opened it last weekend home and it blew crap everywhere. I was obviously still fermenting. Wtf the yeast was eating i have no idea. Me thinks that there is some validity in a gentle swirl of the fv at these potentially high Fg or stalled brews. BTW the stout was spot on.

14 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 5:43 PM

Whats even more intriguing is how does the ferment still happen with a fridged collection. Was a mangrove jack M42 new world ale yeast. If this is correct then it is truly the beast of yeast.

15 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 6:04 PM

I've got a stout based on Mister Sinister in the FV at present, using MJ42 for the first time in my experience. It has been sitting in the garage at between 16° and 18° for the past 5 days, still has a big healthy krausen. I'm wondering if it will have an FG of less than 1.0…

16 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 7:48 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

You would have hated a porter I brewed a few years ago that finished at 1.018 .

Must have been awful!







17 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 9:29 PM

Two interesting points I can comment on here.

I've used M42 just once and it is a BEAST. I think I put a post up on here and a couple of others chimed in and agreed. It was down from OG 1.055 to 1.016 72 hours FROM PITCHING (1.5L starter). Depending on if it strips hop flavours or not, it may become a regular in my brewery for IPAs and maybe even my APAs (which are more like XPAs with the OG and hops I add).

Blacksands, I have always even intrigued with your FGs finishing so low. I haven't compared my recipes to yours closely, but I usually start around 1.050-54 end up with an FG in the 1.014 to 1.015 territory. I tend to use US-05 or M44 as I brew hoppy APAs. No bottle bombs or overcarbonated brews yet, so I'm confident that my brews truly finish at 1.014 for the most part. I think I had some go down as low as 1.012 or 1.011, but IIRC I used dextrose in those intentionally to dry them out.

Drinking my Pirate Life Pale Ale clone right now that finished at 1.014. Not thick, not sweet. Good mouthfeel and definitely sessionable.

18 Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 11:24 PM

BlackSands:

Otto Von Blotto:

You would have hated a porter I brewed a few years ago that finished at 1.018 .

Must have been awful!







It was bloody delicious!

19 Posted: Saturday, June 03, 2017 7:41 AM

joolbag:

Blacksands, I have always even intrigued with your FGs finishing so low. I haven't compared my recipes to yours closely, but I usually start around 1.050-54 end up with an FG in the 1.014 to 1.015 territory. I tend to use US-05 or M44 as I brew hoppy APAs. No bottle bombs or overcarbonated brews yet, so I'm confident that my brews truly finish at 1.014 for the most part. I think I had some go down as low as 1.012 or 1.011, but IIRC I used dextrose in those intentionally to dry them out.


Interesting. Most of my partial mashes feature a small percentage of sugar, and I believe that is the reason for my slightly lower FG's. Playing around in Beersmith I can see the FG figure is definitely altered by increasing the sugar percentage. If I remove the sugar altogether and then compensate by adding more base malt into the recipe I too get FG's = 1.014 - 1.015.

I add a couple hundred grams or so of sugar for two reasons, one to compensate for the unfermentable dextrin component in the LME and also as an ABV ‘top-up’. A Coopers can + max 2.6kg of grain doesn't usually get my OG's up where they need to be in a full 23 litre batch.

20 Posted: Sunday, June 04, 2017 7:51 PM

BlackSands, et al.
As Gomer Pile would say (for us old enough to remember, others go to Imdb).

Surprise, Surprise, Surprise.

The porter (of this thread, but have enjoyed how things track around, especially the Mangrove Jack reference, you were talking yeast, but the fish on handlines, wow) has managed to drop down to 1014 (as of sunday night) and has the occasional bbrupp through the air lock. Maye sub 1010 over next day or so.
I'm thinking all is well, and by next weekend its safe to bottle.
Must have been a ball to be a monk several hundred years ago, trying to get it right. Drink the failures and move on.

BlackSands, further to our other discussions, I have other points of interest to show you over in the “wild yeast infection” thread, bear with me, will try my hardest to upload some photos.

cheers.