1 Posted: Saturday, May 06, 2017 2:17 PM

I am a newbie15 brews down so far .I rack and cold crash my beer now. Which I have found is worth the effort and are doing a Saison and I was just wonder what hops do you think would work these are the hops I have Styrian goldings 60g
bravo 80g
nelson sauvion organic 80g
Calypso usa 60g

the other ingredients goes
1.5kg light pils Lme
1.3kg dme wheat
0.4kg self made light Belgian candy sugar
25g orange peel
danstar saison yeast



cheers Brian

2 Posted: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:40 PM

Hi Brian.

There are no hard & fast rules about what you can & can't use when it comes to hops. Saisons in particular have a very yeast derived character due to the dominant aspects of the strain, so I sort of go with that for a fair fist of my flavour & use any aromatic hops very late in the boil & for dry hopping.

It really comes down to the flavours you want in the beer. Styrian Golding is basically Fuggle, & is quite earthy. Bravo has a light citrus/floral tone & I find is also quite resiny. Nelson Sauvin is tropical like gooseberries, & Calypso is supposed to throw pear/apple like flavours & aromas.

The latter two would be the ones I would play around with in a Saison, not to say you can't use any of the hops you have mentioned.

Have a squiz at the Coopers DIY Saison recipe, as it may give you a few ideas. I've brewed this, & thought it was a very enjoyable beer.

Cheers & good luck with the brew,

Lusty.

3 Posted: Sunday, May 07, 2017 4:19 PM

thanks lusty cheers Brian

4 Posted: Monday, May 08, 2017 5:59 PM

I used Nelson in a saison brewed back in the Summer. I was quite content with the choice in what was a fairly lightweight grain bill.

5 Posted: Wednesday, May 10, 2017 2:46 PM

Thanks Guys I think nelson and maybe a bit of stryian goldings or maybe just nelson I will flip a coin on brew day lol Cheers Brian

6 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 1:50 AM

Hi guys.

Rather than starting a new thread this seemed appropriate here.

I am planning to do another Saison brew soon, so was looking around online for some inspiration. I stumbled upon a recipe that I plan to loosely follow & the brewer recommended using a “soft, low-mineral water throughout the brewing process”.

As an extract/partial brewer I was wondering about the best way to approach this. Should I use a portion of distilled water perhaps as all or part of my top-up water to help create this overall water profile? If so, how much?

While I'm on the subject I would love to hear from those that have tried a few different hops in their Saisons, & which hops you thought worked well. Currently I'm leaning toward some Nelson Sauvin that I'm led to believe works very well as an aromatic hop in with the yeast driven flavours & aromas of the Saison strains.

All thoughts welcomed.

Lusty.

7 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 6:47 AM

Will it make a difference with partial/ extract brewing? <<< the water thing

My last one has Centennial and Nelson late and is stunning.

8 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 7:27 AM

Lusty, I have only ever used Saaz in my Saisons (however I have only made two ).

But I am planning on making one shortly and fermenting it at ambient temps as the fermenting fridge has been in constant use. I have some Sorachi Ace in the freezer I may use.

NS gives the impression it would be well suited to a saison.

9 Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:58 AM

Ben 10:

Will it make a difference with partial/ extract brewing? <<< the water thing

I honestly don't know mate as I haven't dabbled in such things & is why I asked. I was hoping Kelsey might chime in on this one as he uses RO water. (I think?)
Ben 10:

My last one has Centennial and Nelson late and is stunning.

Hairy:

NS gives the impression it would be well suited to a saison.

Alright, you've convinced me.

Centennial & Nelson work extremely well together. It's the mix used in the Nelson's Light recipe I've brewed over & over for my father. I've snuck them into a few recipes of my own over the years too.

Hairy:

But I am planning on making one shortly and fermenting it at ambient temps as the fermenting fridge has been in constant use. I have some Sorachi Ace in the freezer I may use.

Sounds nice. I've heard good things about this hop in Saisons. I've only used it once. Powerful lemon scent. Have a good whiff when you open the bag, that should give you some idea of how much to use.

Thanks guys.

Lusty.

10 Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 12:47 PM

Beerlust:

Hairy:

But I am planning on making one shortly and fermenting it at ambient temps as the fermenting fridge has been in constant use. I have some Sorachi Ace in the freezer I may use.

Sounds nice. I've heard good things about this hop in Saisons. I've only used it once. Powerful lemon scent. Have a good whiff when you open the bag, that should give you some idea of how much to use.

Thanks guys.

Lusty.

I used it a little while ago in an American Wheat Ale. I didn't use a lot as I had heard it was potent and it was perfect. A little goes a long way with that one.

11 Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:25 PM

I use distilled water for pilsners because it's the easiest way I can find at home to mimic that soft water profile that works so well in them.

If you want to dilute your tap water with distilled to a certain point, you need to know the mineral content of the tap water first so you can work out how much tap and distilled water to use together in the total amount of water. Do you have Beersmith? It has a water profile tool where you can plug in your town water profile and then dilute with distilled water until the figures line up approximately with what you're aiming for*. Alternatively you can just start with all distilled water and add minerals back to create a water profile.

I suspect it would have some effect with partial brewing as there is a mash and hop boil involved, maybe a bit less with full extract since there's no mash; it may not have as much effect as it does in a fully AG batch but probably still worth doing.

*Pointless story: when I first began researching pilsners and the water used, I played with that tool but it ended up being something like 90 or 95% distilled water and 5 or 10% tap water to achieve close to the Pilsen profile, so I just though stuff it, might as well make the whole lot distilled and re-add minerals.

Cheers

Kelsey

12 Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:23 PM

You could also use rain water if you have a tank. Not quite the no mineral content of distilled or RO water but very close to it. Its also generally acidic as well which seems to help a lot with PH of the mash. When I investigated using my tank water a lot said dont as there will be bugs and poo and stuff in it but they have come out a treat and a 1 or 1 and a half hour boil will kill anything.

Last edited by Greeny (Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:23 PM)