1 Posted: Monday, January 30, 2017 6:35 PM

Has anyone used this yeast before?? if so what were your thoughts. I did a 13L batch on Sat with an OG of 1062. It was supposed to be 11L @ 1070 but missed the mark a little. Anyway bought a smack pack of Wyeast 1214. It started within 2 hours and seemed to be fermenting very aggressively. I just got home and the fermenting seems to have slowed. So I tested it in my hydrometer and it is reading 1016. 46 points in just 54 hours??? Never ever seen anything like this. Had ferments finish in 4 or 5 days but this may be finished in 3. Its fermenting @ 19c in my ferm fridge which is 1c below the recommended range. Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?

2 Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 7:42 AM

Greeny:

Has anyone used this yeast before?? if so what were your thoughts. I did a 13L batch on Sat with an OG of 1062. It was supposed to be 11L @ 1070 but missed the mark a little. Anyway bought a smack pack of Wyeast 1214. It started within 2 hours and seemed to be fermenting very aggressively. I just got home and the fermenting seems to have slowed. So I tested it in my hydrometer and it is reading 1016. 46 points in just 54 hours??? Never ever seen anything like this. Had ferments finish in 4 or 5 days but this may be finished in 3. Its fermenting @ 19c in my ferm fridge which is 1c below the recommended range. Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?


If it is, i'm not sure what to call the WLP545 Belgian Strong Ale Yeast… 10l went in at 1.050 on Sunday, had a krausen within 12 hours, now 1.007 60 hours later… Fermentation complete! I only took the reading today because the airlock action had slowed, and ow I must conclude the primary fermentation is over…

the main difference in process was that i pitched the yeast into 1l of wort in a jug and whisked the bejaysus out of it, before adding to the rest of the wort.

Anyways - strange one, but will report on the result in due course

3 Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 7:48 AM

Greeny:

So I tested it in my hydrometer and it is reading 1016. 46 points in just 54 hours??? Never ever seen anything like this. Had ferments finish in 4 or 5 days but this may be finished in 3. Its fermenting @ 19c in my ferm fridge which is 1c below the recommended range. Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?


A quick Google suggests many others have had the same experience. Sometimes conditions are juuuuuust right for a nice and fast fermentation.

But there are also reports of apparent attenuation in the 90-95% range, depending on the amount of simple sugars in the recipe. If it were me, I would start increasing the temp 1°C per day to help it attenuate to its full capabilities.

4 Posted: Sunday, February 05, 2017 3:37 PM

Beefy:

Greeny:

So I tested it in my hydrometer and it is reading 1016. 46 points in just 54 hours??? Never ever seen anything like this. Had ferments finish in 4 or 5 days but this may be finished in 3. Its fermenting @ 19c in my ferm fridge which is 1c below the recommended range. Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?


A quick Google suggests many others have had the same experience. Sometimes conditions are juuuuuust right for a nice and fast fermentation.

But there are also reports of apparent attenuation in the 90-95% range, depending on the amount of simple sugars in the recipe. If it were me, I would start increasing the temp 1°C per day to help it attenuate to its full capabilities.


Yeah it was finished inside 3 days. I took it out on the tuesday morning and let it rise naturally and it got to 1006 by the time I was home tuesday afternoon. Put it in the fridge for a cold crash yesterday and plan to bottle tomorrow. 9 days from start to bottle. Not too bad at all.

5 Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 6:32 PM

First time using this yeast as per the Dark Belgian thread.
Took a while for the starter to look active, but got a krausen for five hours and has subsided again now.
Does this strain get much of a krausen when fermenting wort in your experiences?

Cheers

James

6 Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 8:59 AM

Greeny:

Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?

I had a similar experience with the Fermentis Abbaye strain. Took off like a rocket and ripped through a 1.060 wort in no time… perhaps this is a typical characteristic of abbaye strains generally?

7 Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:10 AM

James Lao:

First time using this yeast as per the Dark Belgian thread.
Took a while for the starter to look active, but got a krausen for five hours and has subsided again now.
Does this strain get much of a krausen when fermenting wort in your experiences?

Cheers

James


Not a massive amount James.

8 Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:15 AM

BlackSands:

Greeny:

Is this the Usain Bolt of yeasts?

I had a similar experience with the Fermentis Abbaye strain. Took off like a rocket and ripped through a 1.060 wort in no time… perhaps this is a typical characteristic of abbaye strains generally?


Have found through subsequent batches that it has taken longer to ferment than what this one did for whatever reason. After reading up on trappist brewing I have found that slightly underpitching will give a more Chimay type taste but will also take longer in the fermenter. They still ferment quick like 5 to 7 days for a 1060 ish batch and 8 to 9 days for a 1085 ish batch. Try a 0.75 pitch rate in your next batch and see what you think about the result. I have made it a rule in my belgians and saisons to slightly underpitch to get the extra flavour out of the yeast. Works a treat.

9 Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 11:56 AM

Got an 80mm krausen around 12 -14 hours after pitching.
Looks to be subsiding now and West yorky in the other brew is only just waking up?
Looks like I didnt need to worry about the Belgian Bolt, but the West Yorky plodder is another matter..

Cheers

James

10 Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 11:06 AM

Took a sample yesterday and it was down from 1.065 to 1.013 about 2.5 days after pitching!
Defo quick out the blocks this one.
Not as dark as I would have liked, probably should have used Amber LME.
Tasting pretty good, bit more of a Leffe Brune flavour at the minute.
Will be interested to see how it turns out.

Cheers

James

11 Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 7:19 PM

James Lao:

Took a sample yesterday and it was down from 1.065 to 1.013 about 2.5 days after pitching!
Defo quick out the blocks this one.
Not as dark as I would have liked, probably should have used Amber LME.
Tasting pretty good, bit more of a Leffe Brune flavour at the minute.
Will be interested to see how it turns out.

Cheers

James


Yup. My first use of the yeast did the same. Try a 0.75 pitch rate next time. Will take longer but the flavour will be enhanced.

12 Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 10:23 PM

Got this in the keg 2 days ago.
First few pours have been cloudier than anything I have done before.
I know this is a low to medium floccing yeast but was wondering does it clear up over time?
At the moment I can't even get any light shining through it.
Wondering if it was my post ferment specialty grains to add a bit of more colour to the brew, have made it extra cloudy?
I know it's early days yet, and the Chimay I had the other week was still cloudy and I think they are meant to be aged for at least a year as well?

Cheers

James

13 Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 5:50 PM

I had a quadruple made with 1214 yesterday which is 5 months old and its still not 100% clear. But that is the nature of the style anyway so I'm not too fussed.

One of the big confusing parts for me for 1214 is its supposed to be a low medium floc yeast. The other belgian yeast i have been using 1388 is supposed to be low. 1388 I have found is much better than 1214 so figure that one out.

As far as when to drink them? The quad I had above started to mellow about 3 months in the bottle. Being a brew of around 10% it had a distinct alcohol taste early on but it does mellow out over time. It is beautiful now. But at least 2 months in the bottle IMO. I intend to keep a batch constantly on the go to try and get 3 or 4 months ahead because of this.

As far as kegging. Its the only style (Belgians) I brew that I bottle exclusively as I think they benefit from a secondary ferment in the bottle. Every other beer I brew I keg.

14 Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 12:16 PM

I see what you mean about the bottle conditioning / aging of this type of beer.
The 4 bottles I did on kegging day look to be clearing (7 days in the bottle), when I hold them up to the light, but the beer coming out of the keg is showing no signs of clearing up - murky as anything.
(Think I shouldn't have added the steeped grains post ferment).

Think I might try bottling what's in the keg with maybe 1-2gms of priming sugar, (as it has been carbed in the keg, but would like to get a bit of bottle conditioning happening).
I use the Coopers PET bottles, so I could keep an eye on them if over carbonating.
Have bottled from the keg before when needing to clear the last few litres for the next batch , (but haven't added sugar obviously).

I thought it would only be like a cold crash except it has been carbonated as well..?
Really hope the beer will improve over time, but will need the keg for an upcoming ESB.

Thoughts on bottling the keg carbed beer with small amount of priming sugar to get a bottle condition/ aging thing happening?

Cheers

James

15 Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 3:09 PM

The beer in the keg will take longer to clear than bottles simply because a keg is a lot bigger. If you leave the keg on serving pressure gas then it will carbonate over time because you are feeding it CO2. A lot of guys carbonate their kegs slowly over a week or two on serving pressure like that.

Sounds like you need to get more kegs rather than faff around bottling the last few litres to free the keg up. I think you could get away with a small amount of priming sugar in the bottles because filling a bottle from the tap will displace some CO2 unless you use a counter pressure filler.

Another option you can use if you don't want to muck around with bottles is to have a keg or two that are put aside for use exclusively with longer aged beers. If you want the “bottle conditioning” influence, you can naturally carbonate the keg in the same was as you would bottles.

16 Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 4:46 PM

I think getting another keg is a good idea, but will need to get that past the minister for finance!
Will probably bottle this lot from the keg as it's definitely not doing it for me yet - it needs to be aged.
It's not sour or off or anything, I think it just needs time to properly condition ( probably won't add steeped grains post ferment again either!).
Maybe it's because the look is so murky and brown it's mentally putting me off it?
If it would have been a lot darker, maybe I wouldn't have been bothered by its lack of clarity?
Oh well, putting this one down to experience, have a lot better results with English and American styles it seems..

Cheers

James

17 Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 10:10 PM

Like Kelsey said I have also toyed with the idea of a couple of kegs just for Belgian Brews. However decided against it. The strength of the things makes them a 1 a night type beer for me which ties up a keg for too long. But his suggestion is good if you can tie up the keg.

Oh other thing if you wanna bottle and keep true to style is you must use heavier duty bottles. VB and Tooheys or XXXX bottles just wont cut it with the carbonation pressure. I use the coopers bottles and grolsch bottles

18 Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 11:09 PM

20 odd Coopers PET bottles washed ready for tomorrow.
Think it will really benefit the brew - bottle conditioning them.
Been reading a bit on Trappist / Abbey ales, most of them are best aged 1-2 years I think.

Cheers

James

19 Posted: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:36 AM

James Lao:

Been reading a bit on Trappist / Abbey ales, most of them are best aged 1-2 years I think.

Heavy duty glass bottles would be better for this. PET bottles will allow oxygen in over time and CO2 out, the potential issue here is oxidised and flat beer.

I wouldn't be surprised if the shitty look of the beer is putting you off a bit. As much as some try to deny it, we do taste with our eyes as well as our nose and tongue (in fact smell is about 70 or 80% of taste). If something looks crappy, it affects our perception of its flavor.

How many kegs do you have currently? I'm running 3 taps and I have 7 kegs plus a half size (10L) keg, although one of the 19L ones is dedicated to soda water. This way there's always an empty keg available whenever a batch is ready to be kegged.

20 Posted: Thursday, November 23, 2017 10:47 AM

I think that is the case with the visual perception affecting taste.

I have 2 kegs and 2 taps.
Another keg or 2 will be going onto the wish list along with 2 Robobrews, so I can do side by side brews on brew day.
Will probably have to wait till tax time though ..

Cheers

James