1 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 9:49 PM

Just a question about my second brew. After reading online I decided to make the stout kit with brew enhancer 3 and 300g of brown sugar. But I am a little worried because I only added 20L of water hoping it will be a little stronger. Now that its all set in the fermentor I am a little nervous I over did it with the lower water level and extra sugar. Can anyone let me know if it will be ok?

2 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:01 PM

It will be fine mate. You will end up with a higher ABV but it will be sweet. Make sure you let it age for a while. Maybe stick a couple of bottles in the cupboard for 6 months to compare the difference in ageing.

3 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:03 PM

No need to worry, quite a few people brew Russian Imperial Stout using 3 Coopers tins and a kilo of Dex. You're not that far from the Stouter Stout recipe that runs to 18 litres.
Just a note, I'm told that brown and dark sugars can add a metallic tang to beer, so apparently its best to use them sparingly.

4 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:07 PM

Thanks for the replies. When you say use sparingly, do you think 300g is the upper limit?
And again. Thank you. Its fun, but can be a little nerve racking.

5 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:26 PM

No idea what the limit would be, but I've used 250g of brown sugar in an early amber ale and it was fine, but the same amount of dark muscovado added a very slight twang to an imperial stout.
These days I'm inclined to limit simple sugars like dex and white to 250g, and if I had a special reason to add a darker sugar, back off even further.
I'm sure the more experienced guys will have a more informed view, this is just my rule of thumb to avoid metallic twangy flavours.

6 Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 11:13 PM

MarkC:

No idea what the limit would be, but I've used 250g of brown sugar in an early amber ale and it was fine, but the same amount of dark muscovado added a very slight twang to an imperial stout.
These days I'm inclined to limit simple sugars like dex and white to 250g, and if I had a special reason to add a darker sugar, back off even further.
I'm sure the more experienced guys will have a more informed view, this is just my rule of thumb to avoid metallic twangy flavours.


+1 this advice. I've found the same. Brown sugars get their metallic twang from the iron in the molasses they contain; the darker the sugar, the more molasses. Tastes like rust.

I've tried molasses in stout and will never do it again. Spoiled it.

The Stouter Stout recipe is delicious.

Cheers,

Christina.

7 Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:06 PM

Hey All,
I'm new here and new to brewing completely. I decided to do a stout for my first brew. The issue I had is the temperature on the evening I threw it all together was 28 degrees. When I pitched the yeast the temperature was 22 on the gauge.

My temperature gauge mostly appears within the 24/26/28 range, but don't appear to fluctuate, I'm not sure if I'm just reading it incorrectly or if its faulty. Even with air con I couldn't get the temperature later that evening below 26.

The foamy head appeared the next day and the temperature was set to rise to mid 30's so I moved it into the garage where it's always cooler. The foamy head has since flattened. I don't know if I've ruined it by moving it or if the temperature has taken it's toll. On Day 4 the Hydrometer showed 1010.

What do I do now?

8 Posted: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 10:51 PM

It is probably done. Just wait a few more days and take another hydrometer reading, to make sure it is stable, and then bottle. You may end up with some esters from fermenting that warm, but it should still be drinkable.

Before making your next brew maybe do some reading on swamp coolers etc. You shouldn't be brewing without a cooling method when the ambient temps are >20C. Yeast activity will raise the fermentation temp a few degrees above ambient already.

If you are going to stick with brewing, maybe consider getting a brew fridge? You won't be sorry.

Cheers,

Christina.

9 Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 10:49 AM

Its a personal choice mate!
I agree a good fermentation with healthy yeast is a must if its a bigger ABV beer…over 6% ide be using at least 3x kit yeasts personally

If you start fermentation @18 degrees then let it find itself at 20 degrees for 4 days you will have vary nice ales…I start nearly all my ales @ 16 then they self raise to 18 degrees over 48 hours…

after 4 days (good time to dry hop if doing if permitted) you can let it raise 2 more degrees for a further 4 days it should be finished… before cold crashing 2-4 degrees if you have that option!

Ive used the stout kit on many occasions… But always with malt extract and sometimes as little as 250g brown sugar,

The stout kit with brew enhancer 3… I would avoid adding more sugar… the BE3 already adds the dextrose so be carefull making it to thin,

Perhaps if you used 1kg LDM + 250g brown sugar it would be better,

Hopefully your brew work well to your taste

10 Posted: Thursday, February 02, 2017 11:56 AM

Everyone's doing a stout!! Me too then. Will this work or be silly with the roasted malt and hops? I know hops aren't widly used in stouts but anyway.

Coopers OS Stout
500g Dark Malt Extract
250g Dextrose
250g Brown Sugar
250g Roasted Malt
Irish Ale Yeast Wyeast or something similar
12g EKG
12g Fuggles

Soak roasted malt overnight in two litres water. Strain into pot and ad another three litres of water and the dextrose and bring to boil. 12g EKG @ 5mins and 12g Fuggles flameout. Cool in bath of ice.

Pour tin of stout and brown sugar into fermenter and dissolve with strained still warmish boil pot. Add cold water to pitch and ferment at 19-20 for two weeks?

Yeah or nah

Last edited by twobrewtrueblue (Thursday, February 02, 2017 11:56 AM)