1 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 10:04 AM

I stopped buying PET bottle caps from other suppliers due to them not sealing as well in my opinion. The ones that come with the Coopers PET bottles are good but I have just received some caps not with bottles from Coopers and notice that they are similar to the ones I don't think are suitable. Does anyone have any comments

2 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:29 PM

Ditch the lot and bottle in glass or keg , you won't look back

Just my opinion though , I'm sure PET suits some

Cheers Stu

3 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 5:21 PM

wokka d:

I stopped buying PET bottle caps from other suppliers due to them not sealing as well in my opinion. The ones that come with the Coopers PET bottles are good but I have just received some caps not with bottles from Coopers and notice that they are similar to the ones I don't think are suitable. Does anyone have any comments


G'day wokka, they all work well if you put the effort into screwing them on, try using a wet cloth, washer or towel to increase the torque you are able to apply, I have had issues with only a couple of bottles and they have been culled.

Headsup1:

Ditch the lot and bottle in glass or keg , you won't look back

Just my opinion though , I'm sure PET suits some

Cheers Stu


Here's a heads up Headsup1, try to be helpful.

Cheers.

4 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 5:43 PM

Headsup1:

Ditch the lot and bottle in glass or keg , you won't look back

Just my opinion though , I'm sure PET suits some

Cheers Stu

I whole heartedly agree. Get rid of the plastic and go glass, looks and feels like a beer should, not a bottle of soft drink.

5 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 5:56 PM

Rich and elitist “fan bois” aye.

Not everyone can afford kegs or get enough glass and if you brew “good beer” it tastes good when poured into a glass no matter what it comes out of.

Brew beer, brew good beer and enjoy the fruits of your labour….

Cheers.

6 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 6:36 PM

I'm a long way from rich mate.
It took me about 3 years to gather my collection of Coopers tallies, I use to buy 3 tallies a week and harvest the yeast and keep the bottles. In this time I used plastic but once I had enough I started to use the glass bottles in my bottling rotation until I had enough to replace my plastic all together. Plus I also asked people at work and my mates who drank Coopers to keep the tallies for me.
If I was an elitist I would drink Coopers Sparkling ale and throw away the bottles instead af making my own and bottling it myself.

7 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 7:16 PM

PET bottles are great for some occasions, I take them when camping and for after tag footy or soccer because you can't have glass bottles at council fields.
I've only used the original caps a few times and will need to replace them shortly. I'm hoping to get white caps so I can mark the top of them so I know how many times they have been re-used.
Does anyone have any recommendations on how many times the caps can be re-used before replacing them?

Cheers, Hoops.

8 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 7:58 PM

Headsup1:

Ditch the lot and bottle in glass or keg , you won't look back

Just my opinion though , I'm sure PET suits some

Cheers Stu



I bottle in glass and check all caps when bottling. Last night I opened one and the beer was completely flat.

9 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 8:31 PM

You will get the odd flat beer in glass bottles. I've had it happen as well, but generally 999 out of 1000 of them will seal properly and the beer will carbonate. I imagine this would be the same with the PET bottles too, the disadvantage of them is that they aren't good for long term storage of beers. I don't think too many people will have that issue on a regular basis though!

10 Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2015 10:16 PM

Thanks for all the responses.
Horses for course I suppose.
I have started using a rubber glove–for twisting caps on– and will wait to see if it is a good thing or not.

11 Posted: Monday, May 25, 2015 10:05 AM

Like James , I am far from rich Magnaman and I collected my bottles in a similar way.

My intent was to be helpful and suggest he try glass or kegs , that's all !

If I was “ elitist ” I would probably drink wine and not home brewed beer!

12 Posted: Monday, May 25, 2015 1:35 PM

wokka d:

Thanks for all the responses.
Horses for course I suppose.
I have started using a rubber glove–for twisting caps on– and will wait to see if it is a good thing or not.


Hello wokka

PET bottles are good and I particularly like the Coopers ones. I've got quite a few hundred or so and they work really well with the coopers caps; and they've been used and re-used lots of times, including the caps. Haven't noticed any problems that can be put down to a problem with the caps, and the caps get a really good (and long) soaking in Starsan - in fact, when not on the bottles, you could almost say they are stored in starsan.

I haven't resorted to using a rubber glove yet (I prefer to keep those for digital rectal examinations), but I do tend to put them on very firmly. Sometimes when bottling a 40 or 50 litre batch, the webbing of skin between the thumb and index finger can get a bit tender towards the end. And when opening them, more than once I've had to resort to using a tea towel or similar to undo the lid.

Keep going with the PET if you like them; I know I shall before being able to afford kegging.

Cheers

13 Posted: Monday, May 25, 2015 1:50 PM

G'day James & Headsup1, you both seem to be a little pissed at my “Rich and elitist ”fan bois" aye. comments and for that I apologize, but I hope it made you at least think?

If someone has a specific problem please try to help that, other then giving some answer that just related to a money answer “keg” or use glass, I hope you get my point.

Maybe that person and others here home brew because they can't afford to even buy 3 tallies a week, week in and week out for a long time.

Okay you have issues with “pet bottles” fine use what ever you want and I hope you have good results and enjoy good beer.

James:

I'm a long way from rich mate.
It took me about 3 years to gather my collection of Coopers tallies, I use to buy 3 tallies a week and harvest the yeast and keep the bottles. In this time I used plastic but once I had enough I started to use the glass bottles in my bottling rotation until I had enough to replace my plastic all together. Plus I also asked people at work and my mates who drank Coopers to keep the tallies for me.
If I was an elitist I would drink Coopers Sparkling ale and throw away the bottles instead af making my own and bottling it myself.


Headsup1:

Like James , I am far from rich Magnaman and I collected my bottles in a similar way.

My intent was to be helpful and suggest he try glass or kegs , that's all !

If I was “ elitist ” I would probably drink wine and not home brewed beer!


As for answering the OP's issues and giving a little direction so that they may be able to deal with the problem at hand, well I found your responses to be obtuse, and having a couple of home brews on board I reacted poorly and could have been more tactful.

Cheers.

14 Posted: Tuesday, May 26, 2015 8:38 AM

This may sounds obvious but I'll blurt it out anyway.

The last nip up of the PET cap is more easily done by gripping the cap (using a tea towel or glove to prevent your hands from becoming raw) and twisting the bottle.

15 Posted: Tuesday, May 26, 2015 11:55 AM

Better still, I used to use the silicone bottle/jar openers that people with arthritis use. Easily available and cheap.
Cheers

16 Posted: Tuesday, May 26, 2015 12:06 PM

I still use PET bottles and I also use glass. Just got another batch of 300 white caps delivered actually

17 Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:04 PM

I use both glass and PET, if I plan to give away some beer, I'll use 330ml glass that I collect from work fri arvo drinks etc. One benefit of PET's is that they are great at holding the yeast neatly in the 5 or 6 bottle ‘feet’ things, remains compacted in these I have found til the last drop is poured, where with glass it becomes mobile and you have to waste the last bit to avoid pouring it.

Also great for checking carbonation progress with the ‘squeeze’ test.

18 Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 2:29 PM

headmaster:

Also great for checking carbonation progress with the ‘squeeze’ test.


I always bottle a few in PET for this reason despite having put in a lot of hard work building up my glass collection…..

I have to be honest, though, the ones in glass always seem to taste just a little better……….

19 Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 3:50 PM

I check my glass bottles for carbonation by looking for condensation on the inside of the bottle in the headspace. Whether it's actually due to fermentation of priming sugar or simply evaporation I have no idea, but the ones with more condensation always seem more fizzy to me. Never see this condensation in commercial beers that have been force carbed though.

20 Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 4:13 PM

Thank you everybody who replied. I didn't mean to start any arguments ;-)
All the info is very helpful. I already use a rubber glove –to screw the caps on– and find that it gets them nice and tight.
I use a silver metallic “Sharpie” marker pen available at Officeworks on my black tops, works well on the bottles as well–does not wash off.