1 Posted: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 7:32 PM

Hi guys.

I recently sampled a couple of beers from a very newly established commercial craft brewery here in South Australia, called "Pirate Life“.

At this point in time, they offer 3 beers. I have sampled 2 of those & they are very well made beers (IMHO).

Cutting to the chase for this thread, the most interesting of those two beers to me that I sampled was the ”Throwback IPA" @ 3.5% ABV. Creating a flavoursome beer @ this ABV% level is quite a task & as far as I'm concerned there are very few breweries that do it well, or create any lasting interest from their efforts.

At the top of the heap (IMHO) is Little Creatures ‘Rogers’, & not far behind, albeit being a different type of mid-strength, is Coopers ‘Mild Ale’ that I feel is very much underrated in this category.

(IMHO) Pirate Life's ‘Throwback IPA’ is closer to Coopers Mild Ale in flavour than Little Creatures ‘Rogers’. What I do find very interesting in what has been disclosed about Pirate Life's mid-strength IPA is that the OG is apparently 1.040.

For those interested, a starting OG of 1.040 is not easily brewed down to a final 3.5% ABV.

So my question to those on the forum who like a challenge is, how would you go about creating a high quality 3.5% final ABV beer from a malt grist that made a 1.040 OG without it ending up the least bit sweet?

Given free license to create bold flavours @ any ABV% you want I reckon is easy. It's when you are restricted ABV%-wise do you really have to do some thinking.

I already have some ideas about how they do it, but would really enjoy hearing from those on the forum on how each would personally go about it. Figures to back your argument up here are almost a given.

I'll look forward to the discussion that follows.

Lusty.

2 Posted: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 9:08 PM

Mid-strength Nirvana? That would be Pearl Jam, wouldn't it?

As for your post, it should be fairly easy. Mash high.

I have made two mid-strengths, both mashed at 69-70 degrees and both finished around 1020. One was more on the malty side and one more on the hoppy side but neither were sweet.

They were both sub 3% ABV (borderline light beer ) and I found them both delicious

Edit: My Dark Mild had an OG of 1042. I can't find the notes for the Dr Smurto's Amber Ale but the OG would have been similar.

3 Posted: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 9:51 PM

That was my initial thought too, mash high and hop it enough to balance out the sweetness from the higher FG. I'm way too tired to bother mucking about coming up with actual figures right now though.

4 Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015 9:07 AM

Lusty, you need to try these beers.

Brew Dog - Dead Pony Pale Ale (IBU 40 / 3.8%)
https://www.brewdog.com/beer/headliners/dead-pony-pale-ale

Bridge Road Brewers - Little Bling Mid-strength IPA (3.4%)

5 Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015 9:45 AM

Hairy:

Mid-strength Nirvana? That would be Pearl Jam, wouldn't it?


I was thinking more along the lines of this:

6 Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015 12:16 PM

7 Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015 1:09 PM

King Ruddager:

Hairy:

Mid-strength Nirvana? That would be Pearl Jam, wouldn't it?


I was thinking more along the lines of this:

I actually have that DVD.

I'm not certain, but I think that was Kurt Cobain's last public performance. I think about 3 months later, let's just say, he was no longer with us.

Anyways, back to brewing…

Not everyone has the ability to mash grain to produce a less fermentable wort. For extract & kit based brewers, using a greater percentage of specialty grains & a lower attenuating yeast can also help out in this area yes?

I'm eyeing off using some Wyeast 1332 for a brew like this with an increased percentage of CaraPils to achieve a similar outcome. Attenuation on that yeast is quite low (approx. 67-71%). Anyone used it before?

Cheers,

Lusty.

8 Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015 7:17 PM

I have that album and quite like it Not really mid-strength but definitely not as hoppy.

I have used Wyeast 1332 in my first all grain American pale ale. It was a great yeast. I have read that it is a low attenuator but I didn't it find it that low. Definitely at the top end of the range you listed. But perhaps I mashed lower than I thought and had a more fermentable wort.

9 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 2:32 AM

ICzed:

Lusty, you need to try these beers.

Brew Dog - Dead Pony Pale Ale (IBU 40 / 3.8%)
https://www.brewdog.com/beer/headliners/dead-pony-pale-ale

Bridge Road Brewers - Little Bling Mid-strength IPA (3.4%)

Yes, yes it sounds like I do!

I'll have to pop into Dan's & see if any of them are on the shelves.
“Dead Pony Pale Ale”. What sort of miserable, cruel name for a beer is that??!

Thanks for the info on the 1332 Hairy. Even @ 71% attenuation it'll be better than the norm 75%+ yeasts for this type of brew I guess. Just considering what possibilities are open to me as an extract/partial brewer.

Cheers,

Lusty.

10 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 3:45 PM

Beerlust:

Not everyone has the ability to mash grain to produce a less fermentable wort.


Yes they do.
A small esky or a power point is all you need. Make the leap to have ultimate control over what you are producing.

Or try S-04 yeast and have it stall at 1020.

11 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 3:54 PM

Ben 10:

Yes they do.
A small esky or a power point is all you need. Make the leap to have ultimate control over what you are producing.


Or even a slow cooker (they used to be called crock pots IIRC) connected to your temp controller. There's probably already one in the back of the kitchen cupboard that never gets opened.

12 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 5:47 PM

Hey Ben and P2 if I didn't know any better I would think you two are slinging excrement at Sir Lusty.

13 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 5:56 PM

Bite your tongue, you venomous snake.

14 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 6:51 PM

Ben 10:

Or try S-04 yeast and have it stall at 1020.

15 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 7:12 PM

Murray's Punch and Judy is another great middy.

Lusty, do a stove top BIAB. I support kits and extract brewing but sometimes you need more control over the fermentability of your wort.

16 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 7:35 PM

Ben 10:

Beerlust:

Not everyone has the ability to mash grain to produce a less fermentable wort.


Yes they do.
A small esky or a power point is all you need. Make the leap to have ultimate control over what you are producing.

Ability & equipment are not the same thing.

17 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 7:43 PM

Beerlust:

Ability & equipment are not the same thing.


M'kay. I see what you mean now. I had the ability to be a dad, but not the…

18 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 7:45 PM

Hairy:

Lusty, do a stove top BIAB. I support kits and extract brewing but sometimes you need more control over the fermentability of your wort.

I agree with both Ben & yourself, & you make a good point Hairy. It's just a lot of faffing about that I'm not that interested in (TBQH). I'm happy I can mini-mash within a certain range that will guarantee me some good quality wort to combine with my extract & fresh hops/yeast etc. atm.

I've been chatting on another forum I frequent about beta-gluc steeping, & may actually make this a part of my mini-mash procedure in certain instances where authenticity of ingredients is required. Apart from that, I'm happy with the quality of beer I produce. It may be a level slightly under full AG produced beers, but I can live with that.

Pots & pans extract brewer is whatz I am, & thatz all that I am….

Someone hand me a tin of spinach!

Cheers,

Lusty.

19 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 8:01 PM

Anyone who thinks mashing grains is difficult is kidding themselves. I mean, really all you need to do is dump them in some water and maintain a temperature for a period of time. It's not really any harder than mixing up tins of goo to be honest. Time wise though, yes it takes longer obviously.

That said, if you're spending the time to mash grains for mini mashes, why not simply increase the amount to get more control of your recipes? It should take the same amount of time. If you're happy with the quality you're producing with your current process then that's fair enough, but just another perspective on it.

20 Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 8:28 PM

Otto Von Blotto:

…That said, if you're spending the time to mash grains for mini mashes, why not simply increase the amount to get more control of your recipes?

Pots, pans, lower create-able volumes, an oven, a stove-top burner, & occasionally I can't be bothered with long brew days & will mix up a kit-based brew with some added steeped grains/added hops for a short brewday.

That sums up my reason to stay where I am pretty well.

Cheers,

Lusty.